Economic Contributors

In 2008, America's hospitals treated 123 million people in their emergency departments, provided care for 624 million outpatients, performed 27 million surgeries, and delivered 4 million babies.  However, the importance of hospitals to their communities extends far beyond health care. 

The three most rural counties in New Hampshire are home to six critical access hospitals serving a total population of about 123,000. Together, they are the largest employers in their regions, with payroll and benefits of approximately $145 million.

Louisiana hospitals employ more than 98,000 people and generate more than $29.9 billion in economic activity.

Hospitals in Mississippi provide 5.7% of statewide employment, with 60,143 full-time equivalent employees and an additional 34,557 jobs outside of their facilities.

In 55 of the 67 Pennsylvania counties, hospitals are among the top five employers, providing family‐sustaining jobs and solid benefits.

When
all
multiplier
effects
are calculated, Aurora Health Care System’s
economic
impact
accounts
for
an
estimated
5.5
percent
of
all
employment
and
6.3
percent
of
total
payroll
in
metro
Milwaukee, with
more than
41,000
jobs
in
the
region
directly
or
indirectly
attributable
to
Aurora’s
operations.

Oregon Health & Science University is the state’s only academic health center, and is among the state’s largest health care providers, educational institutions, research centers and employers. Data shows that if OHSU did not exist, economic activity in Oregon would decrease by an estimated $2.351 billion in economic output and 20,625 jobs.

In 2012, hospital expenditures in South Carolina came to about $9.7 billion, while the effect of these expenditures on the state's total economic output was approximately $20.5 billion. Hospital payroll and benefits added up to about $4.4 billion.

Wyoming's health-care sector is responsible for 10.3% of the state's employment, and the hospitals contribute approximately $445 million to the state's economy annually.

Tennessee hospitals’ spending for supplies and services, as well as hospital employee family members working and earning salaries in the community, resulted in a total hospital impact of 209,808 employees and a total income impact of $5.5 billion.

Virginia’s hospitals and health systems had an economic impact of $28 billion in 2011, according to a study by the Virginia Hospital & Healthcare Association. That figure includes $15.4 billion in direct spending on employee pay and capital expenses plus another $12.6 billion in indirect spending by other businesses and individuals.

The economic impact of the health care sector is perhaps most valuable to rural areas. In Kentucky, for every one Marshall County Hospital job, an additional 0.23 jobs are created in the local economy. In total, 319 jobs in Marshall County are directly or indirectly tied to the existence of the hospital.

The health care sector’s overall contribution to the gross state product, directly and indirectly, in Nebraska is estimated at $9.17 billion.

Alabama hospitals provide about $4 billion in salaries and benefits, which results in another $2.7 billion indirectly, for a total of $6.7 billion in labor income for the state.

Missouri hospitals’ investments in employees and capital in 2012 created more than $19 billion in value-added output for the state’s economy. Missouri’s 155 hospitals employ 152,964 employees. These employees earned $7.5 billion in wages and received $1.9 billion in benefits in 2012.

Novant Health’s operations support about 43,000 jobs in the state of North Carolina through the system’s dual role as a provider of health care and purchaser of local goods and services. Wages, salaries and benefits total an estimated $2.3 billion.

Community hospitals in Idaho employ nearly 25,000 people and have an annual payroll totaling $1.26 billion. When the indirect and ripple effect of hospitals on Idaho’s economy is taken into account, those numbers soar to 66,428 jobs and $2.88 billion in payroll.

The expansion of Jersey Shore University Medical Center helped create jobs during its construction phase. As many as 525 local contractors and workers were employed each year on the project since ground was broken in 2006. And by 2011, another 264 full-time jobs were added to the 3,000 employees currently working at the hospital.

Consider the multiplier effect. The total impact of Wisconsin hospitals is 226,600 jobs, $11.17 billion in labor income, $15.2 billion in total income and $28.6 billion in industrial sales.

West Virginians depend on hospitals to provide health care to 1.8 people, and also to provide more than 43,500 jobs, purchase millions of dollars in supplies and services, and invest millions of dollars in capital projects. With the additional jobs and spending these roles generate, the total positive economic impact of West Virginia hospitals on the state is more than $8.2 billion annually.

Thirty-four percent of those employed in Maine’s health care sector work for Maine hospitals. That’s more than 36,400 people. In addition, Maine hospitals create slightly more than one additional job for every employee. That means 77,239 Mainers can tie their employment to a hospital.

Hospitals are the largest part of Montana’s health care economy, accounting for more than 20,000 jobs. Average annual wages in ambulatory care and hospital settings are significantly higher than the average for all jobs in the state.

Massachusetts General Hospital is Boston’s largest employer with 14,752 employees, followed by Brigham and Women’s Hospital with 11,229 employees.

Tanner Health System has a regional economic impact of more than $662 million. The system employs more than 2,500 people representing a wide range of skill sets from physicians and nurses to accountants, dietary and environmental services staff.

Hackensack University Health Network is one of the largest health networks in the state of New Jersey and is a major employer, with nearly 10,000 employees and 2,700 credentialed physicians.

Hospitals in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula region serve as a major economic driver, employing more than 24,135 people, and the health care sector provides close to $1.5 billion in economic value to the region.

At a time of ongoing economic uncertainty, Pennsylvania hospitals continue to be top economic contributors and major employers.  Hospitals’ contributions to the state’s economy increased by close to $6 billion – from nearly $98 billion in 2011 to nearly $104 billion in 2012.  Pennsylvania hospitals supported nearly 592,000 total jobs, directly and indirectly through the ripple effect.

A 2012 report commissioned by the Hospital Council of Northern and Central California found that hospitals in the greater Sacramento area (Sacramento, Yolo, Placer, El Dorado, Yuba and Sutter counties) generate $11.7 billion annually in total economic output and 84,176 jobs.

In 2012, the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix was recognized as an "economic driver" by the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce. With an annual economic impact in Arizona of $1.5 billion, Mayo Clinic's presence has been a significant economic driver for the state in the form of jobs, tax revenue, research and education.

In 2011 and 2012, Norwood Hospital contributed $2 million in local property taxes, making it the third-largest contributor. Additionally Norwood, part of Steward Health System, is one of the largest employers in the area, generating additional economic benefits to the community through the 33,000 jobs indirectly supported by the health system.

According to a study by the Michigan Health and Hospital Association, hospitals in Bay County employ 6,255 people and support a total of 8,943 jobs.

The two hospitals in Sioux City, Mercy Medical Center and Unity Point Health – St. Luke’s, combine to produce 2,481 jobs that have a $225 million impact on the regional economy, according to a new study by the Iowa Hospital Association.

Norwood Hospital provided $11.6 million in community benefits and delivered $2 million in tax revenues to the Town of Norwood. It is also one of the largest employers in Norwood and generates additional economic benefits to the community that support approximately 33,000 jobs, generate nearly $35 million in local real estate taxes and is responsible for $8.4 billion of economic impact in 2011 and 2012.

According to a study released by the Greater Cincinnati Health Council, the economic impact attributed to 31 of Greater Cincinnati’s hospitals and their affiliated facilities in 2012 totaled $17.53 billion. This figure represents a 13.9 percent increase in inflation-adjusted dollars since 2007, the last time the study was commissioned.

Hospitals in Chicago and the surrounding suburbs provided $16 billion in economic impact, while employing more than 69,300 people.

The hospital sector in Kansas employed an estimated 81,303 people in 2012-2013 and had an employment multiplier of 1.73, meaning that for each job created in the hospital sector, another 0.73 jobs were created in other businesses and industries in the state's economy. This is often called the ripple effect. The direct contribution of the 81,303 hospital employees resulted in an indirect contribution of 59,238 jobs throughout all businesses and industries in the state. Thus, the hospital sector employment had a total contribution on state employment of 140,541 jobs.

Illinois hospitals and health systems employ more than a quarter of a million people, generating nearly 450,000 direct and indirect jobs. Annually, Illinois hospitals and healthy systems generate $83.4 billion for the state and local economies.

Hospitals in Utah provide jobs for more than 40,000 individuals and spend more than $2.2 billion in payroll and benefits annually. That equates to approximately 7.8% of Utah’s overall employment picture.

Iowa has 118 community hospitals, and they create an enormous economic impact across the state. According to a study by the Iowa Hospital Association, Iowa hospitals provide more than 71,000 jobs that pay more than $4.1 billion in salaries and benefits. But the economic impact of hospitals extends beyond the people they hire and the salaries that are paid. The business and household needs of hospitals and their employees create a "multiplier" effect that supports thousands of additional jobs. This means that, in total, nearly 120,000 jobs are tied to Iowa hospitals, creating an overall impact that is worth nearly $6 billion to Iowa's economy.

A recent report by the Kansas Hospital Association showed that health care services employed nearly 224,000 people, or 11.9% of all job holders in the state. Health care also generated $14.2 billion in total income and more than $22.5 billion in total sales in Kansas, playing an important direct role in the state’s economy.

In addition to enhancing the health and well-being of the communities they care for, Rhode Island hospitals also contribute significantly to the state’s economic health. In 2012, the estimated total economic impact was $6.7 billion.

The Minnesota Hospital Association represents 144 hospitals and health systems, which directly employ more than 113,000 people. Another 100,000 jobs are tied to health care making up 8.3% of the total state work force.

The daily operations of 31 of Greater Cincinnati’s hospitals and their affiliated facilities resulted in a multi-billion dollar boost to the Tristate economy in 2012. According to a study released by the Greater Cincinnati Health Council, the economic impact attributed to these hospitals in 2012 totaled $17.53 billion.

Mercy and Unity Hospitals, through expenditures for operations, contributed $507.7 million in economic activity and supported jobs for 4,990 people in the Twin Cities metro area.

The 2013 economic impact of the 85 member hospitals of the Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital Council on the North Texas economy is $14.4 billion in labor income. The study showed hospital expenditures on retail sales contributed $4.6 billion, which produced $288.7 million in state sales taxes. DFWHC member hospitals also generated 265,294 total jobs, an increase from 237,058 in 2010.

Martha Jefferson Hospital serves an estimated 1,200 residents living in a local mobile home park who are predominantly low income and more than half are Spanish speaking. The hospital conducts annual screenings at the mobile home park. Initially, turnout was not high, but the percentage of individuals found at-risk for diabetes and/or high blood pressure far exceeded national norms. Unsatisfied with the low turnout, the hospital brought in a registered nurse/childbirth educator fluent in Spanish to talk to the patients and begin building trusting relationships through ongoing health education programs. The number of patients who were vaccinated for the flu has doubled.

The University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus is an important engine to the state economy, including education, training, research, clinical health care and community service activities. Direct medical campus employment tops 8,000 and the campus created nearly 9,700 additional jobs for a total employment impact of nearly 17,800 jobs in Colorado.

Cape Regional Medical Center employs more than 815 people in the Cape May community and contributed more than $18.6 million to the economy through purchases of various goods and services.

The economic impact of the UCLA Health System (which includes four hospitals and a faculty practice group) and UCLA Health Sciences (which includes schools of medicine, nursing, dentistry and public health) had a direct output of $3.2 billion and a workforce of 21,000 full- and part-time employees. The organizations have a combined economic impact of $7.7 billion and help support an additional 32,000 jobs.

New Jersey hospitals are a vital community resource, serving more than 18 million patients annually and employing more than 144,000 people. Hospitals in New Jersey contribute more than $20 billion to the economy.

Overall, North Bay hospitals and hospital-related spending generate $4.9 billion in spending annually and 35,480 jobs. North Bay hospitals also provide $376 million annually in charity and unreimbursed care, and this figure continues to increase over time, according to a recent study by the Hospital Council of Northern and Central California.

Good Samaritan Hospital is one of the largest employers in the Long Island area, providing the highest quality care possible, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, with more than 4,500 employees. Good Samaritan contributes more than $25 million in state and local taxes annually and provides more than $49 million to uncompensated and charity care each year.

Hospitals have a significant impact on the economy in Arkansas, with direct employment of roughly 42,300 people and payroll of $2.7 billion. Additionally, it is estimated that hospitals support thousands more jobs in everything from retail to various services and buy almost $3 billion in supplies.

St. Anthony Regional Hospital’s 576 hospital jobs fuel a total of 970 jobs in the Carroll area that add $31,025,842 to the Carroll economy. In addition, St. Anthony Regional Hospital employees by themselves spend $10,980,291 on retail sales and contribute $549,015 in state sales tax revenue through their purchasing power.

Lourdes Hospital facilities contribute to the local community with an economic impact of $285 million. Additionally generating more than 1,483 jobs across the Lourdes network, they are one of the largest employers in the region.

Georgia Regents Medical Center plays a critical role in boosting Augusta’s financial health by pumping more than $1.1 billion into the economy. GRMC, which includes Children’s Hospital of Georgia and more than 80 outpatient clinics, supports about 7,530 full-time jobs, while the Medical Associates supports about 1,480 positions.

Nassau University Medical Center plays an integral role in the economy and local communities on Long Island, employing more 3,500 people with an estimated total annual economic impact of $1,000,000,000.

The largest employer in western Michigan, Spectrum Health contributes to the health of the regional economy. With nearly 19,000 employees, Spectrum Health spends $1.2 billion annually on payroll and benefits

St. Mary’s Health Care System generated more than $365.7 million in revenue for the local and state economy in 2011, the latest year for which data is available, according to a recent report by the Georgia Hospital Association. The report found that, during the same time period, St. Mary’s provided approximately $12.3 million in uncompensated care while sustaining 2,534 full-time jobs throughout northeast Georgia and the rest of the state. Jobs provided directly by St. Mary’s combined with those generated by the system’s economic impact generated more than $140 million in household earnings.

Stony Brook University Hospital is a critical component to the economic viability of the community it serves, with an economic impact totaling $1,620,844,000. A key component of this is the 5,290 people the hospital employs.

A new report from the Georgia Hospital Association pegs Tanner Health System’s economic impact to the region it serves at more than $666.3 million in revenue for the local economy. The data show Tanner also created almost 5,100 full-time jobs in the region.

Utah’s hospitals provide jobs for more than 40,000 individuals and pay out more than $2.2 billion in payroll and benefits annually. That equates to approximately 7.8% of Utah’s overall employment picture. Along with being significant local employers, hospitals are also major purchasers.

St. James Parish Hospital represents 223 direct and indirect jobs and is responsible for a $1.3 million boost in retail sales. Even the hospital’s recent construction project had a positive impact on the local economy, resulting in 45 new direct and indirect jobs and $212,874 in additional local retail sales.

Hospitals in Solano County, California support more than 7,800 jobs (including 4,085 directly at hospitals) and the hospital industry generates or supports more than 11% of the county’s economy, according to a study by the Hospital Council of Northern and Central California.

According to a recent report by The Hospital and Healthsystem Association of Pennsylvania, Geisinger Health System has an annual $6.1 billion positive impact on the local, regional and Pennsylvania economy. As a major employer of more than 19,000 people and through the ripple effect created by utilization of Pennsylvania suppliers and other businesses, GHS supports more than 30,280 jobs in the state, according to the report.

Hospitals are one of the largest private-sector employers in the state of Maryland, employing nearly 100,000 workers. Those hospital jobs are estimated to support an additional 206,000 jobs
in the state because of the economic “ripple effect” – additional jobs and economic activity outside of hospitals created as a result of hospitals’ direct economic impact.

According to a 2012 study by the National Center for Rural Health Works, rural hospitals are one of the largest employers in a rural economy, typically one of the top two employers. A typical critical access hospital has a medical service area population of 14,600, and the total economic impact of a typical critical access hospital is 195 employees and $8.4 million in payroll.

Wayne County Hospital is a major contributor to the economic security of its community. The economic impact of Wayne County Hospital back into the community is roughly an eleven-fold return on investment based upon the number of taxpayer dollars received in the same year. The hospital remains one of the largest employers in the county, generating 245 jobs that add $11,358,687 to the local economy.

Southwest Health System, which includes Southwest Memorial Hospital, several clinics and related health care programs, is an important piece of Montezuma County’s health and economic life. SHS employs roughly 350 people with a payroll of $19.2 million but is considered an employment multiplier - that is, for every 10 jobs on the SHS payroll, an additional three jobs were generated in the county. And for every $50,000 of payroll by SHS, another $8,000 of income was received by workers in Montezuma County.

University of Maryland Medical System is a private, not-for-profit network of 12 academic, community and specialty hospitals throughout Maryland. UMMS is a major employer for the state, employing more than 21,000 people.

Hospitals generate spending of nearly $5 billion a year and more than 35,000 jobs in Sonoma, Marin, Mendocino, Lake and Napa counties, according to data from the Hospital Council of Northern and Central California. Those jobs pay above-average wages and are more resistant to cuts during recessions, the report said. Also according to the report, the sector is expected to grow faster than the rest of the economy, on average.

Pocono Health System/Pocono Medical Center annually contributes more than $443 million to the region’s economy, according to a recent report released by The Hospital & Healthsystem Association of Pennsylvania (HAP). Pocono Health System/Pocono Medical Center also supports more than 2,688 jobs in the region.

Connecticut hospitals contribute $20 billion to the state and local economies, according to a report compiled by the Connecticut Hospital Association earlier this year. The report demonstrates that Connecticut hospitals provide more than 54,000 jobs, with a total annual payroll of $5.2 billion. Earnings by Connecticut hospital and health system employees reverberate through the community, creating an additional 55,000 jobs.

The economic impact of Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital Council’s 75 hospitals on the North Texas economy is 12.2 billion. Additionally these hospitals generate nearly 240,000 jobs in the state of Texas.

The Kansas hospital sector employed an estimated 81,931 people in 2011-2012 and had an employment multiplier of 1.75 (rounded). This means that for each job created in the hospital sector, another 0.75 jobs were created in other businesses and industries in the state’s economy. This is often called the ripple effect. The direct contribution of the 81,931 hospital employees resulted in an indirect contribution of 61,855 jobs throughout all businesses and industries in the state. Thus, the hospital sector employment had a total contribution to Kansas employment of 143,786 jobs.

Utah’s hospitals provide jobs for more than 40,000 individuals and pay more than $2.2 billion in payroll and benefits annually.

Hospitals in Massachusetts employed more than 197,000 people in 2012 and created more than $51 billion dollars in economic activity in 2011.

The nation’s medical schools and teaching hospitals had a combined economic impact of $587 billion and supported nearly 3.5 million jobs directly or indirectly in 2011.

The Hospital Association of Rhode Island recently released its annual economic impact report, which details $6.7 billion in economic contributions. Hospitals are a major economic engine in the state; employing 21,100 health care professionals; paying $1.9 billion in wages; and spending more than $1.3 billion on goods and services.

A recent University of Florida study, commissioned by the Florida Hospital Association, suggests that the state’s hospitals support nearly 930,000 full- and part-time jobs, while generating $120 billion in economic activity.

Michigan hospitals are economic engines, directly employing nearly 219,000 individuals throughout the state and often serving as the largest employer in their communities. They are saving individuals and businesses more than $500 million in health care costs annually by operating as efficiently as possible.

According to a recent economic impact study, Elizabethtown Community Hospital's influence reaches far beyond the realm of medical services. During the 2010 cost-report year, ECH employed 220 people in various capacities, resulting in a payroll of $10,278,000. The survey indicated that these employees spent $5,093,000 locally. During the 2010 reporting year, ECH supply purchases totaled $6,578,000 and capital spending amounted to $1,927,000, a total impact of $23,876,000. In addition to the goods purchased, sales taxes affected economies by providing the state with $424,000, and locally $439,000 was realized.

Auburn Community Hospital plays a critical role in the economic viability of its community. From the people it employs to the direct and indirect effects of spending, its value as an economic engine for the local community is considerable. In 2010, the hospital employed 760 people, with a total payroll of $56,983,000. Dollars earned by these employees are spent on groceries, clothing, mortgage payments, rent, etc., which generate approximately $103,845,000 in economic activity for the local economy. Auburn Community Hospital payroll expenditures serve as an important economic stimulus, creating and supporting jobs throughout the local and state economies.

Delaware's hospitals have a tremendous impact on the health care and economy of the state, representing an impressive employment base and a key economic contributor.  Delaware hospitals employed a combined total of 20,458 people and in FY 2011 had expenditures of just over $1.2 billion in annual payroll.

A recent study by the Kansas Hospital Association shows that health care services employed 226,333 people, or 12%, of all job holders in the state. The health sector plays an important direct role in the state's economy - with health care services being the fourth-largest aggregate employer in the state and the fifth-largest producer of total income

Seven of Ohio's top 12 employers are hospitals or health systems. Additionally, Ohio hospitals invest in new information technology, equipment and facilities, which translates to every dollar spent by hospitals generating an additional $1.23 in the state's economy.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, hospitals added more than 81,000 private sector jobs across the nation over the past year. Health care is responsible for one in six new jobs and, despite the economy, health care employs 24% more people than it did 10 years ago.

In 2011, America's hospitals employed more than 5.4 million people.

New Jersey's acute care hospitals are responsible for providing more than 114,000 full-time equivalent jobs and total employment of 140,000 full-time and part-time positions.

Community hospitals in New Mexico  employ more than 28,177 people. Additionally, another 57,115 jobs are created due to hospitals, with the total employment impact being 85,292 jobs.

The health care field added 26,000 jobs per month this year, with hospitals adding 8,000 jobs just in the month of November.

Parkland Health and Hospital System plays a critical role in the vitality of the community through its support of those who have no resources for health care services. In addition, Parkland employees 9,300 people.

Last year the economic impact of the 75 member hospitals of the Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital Council (DFWHC) on the North Texas economy was $12.2 billion. Additionally, the DFWHC member hospitals also generated 237,058 total jobs within Texas.

An example of the economic impact of Missouri's hospitals, Truman Medical Centers employs more than 4,000 people. In addition, its business activity—including capital improvements—infuses as much as $120 million into the local economy through supplies, commodities, utility payments and building projects in any given year.

There are 42 community hospitals in North Dakota and close to 22,000 full-time employees at those hospitals, making ND health care systems the state's largest employers. The direct economic impact of North Dakota community hospitals is $2.85 billion and, when combined with secondary impacts, the total climbs to $4.78 billion.

New Jersey hospitals contributed $19.5 billion to the Garden State economy in 2011, reflecting strong growth of $900 million compared with 2010, according to the 2012 N.J. Hospitals Economic Impact Report recently released by the New Jersey Hospital Association.

In January 2012, the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation completed a report estimating that in 2010, the hospitals in the HASC region contributed $74.4 billion in total economic output and supported 507,550 full and part-time jobs with total labor income (including benefits) of $31.9 billion. This economic activity is estimated to have generated $3.8 billion in state and local taxes.

Health care added 44,000 jobs in September, with hospitals adding 8,000. Over the past year, employment in health care has risen by 295,000.

San Francisco hospitals, research universities and institutes, medical education and biomedical firms are responsible for 104,035 jobs – almost one in five jobs in San Francisco.

The 102 hospitals in Arizona employed nearly 80,000 people in 2011, accounting for 2.8 percent of total state employment, and supported more than 90,000 jobs, including those employed in other industries but whose jobs depend on economic activity created by hospitals.

44,300 Arkansans are employed by hospitals, which have a combined annual payroll of $1.7 billion that helps to support about 7.7% of all non-farm jobs in the state through direct and indirect purchases of goods and services.

In August, the health care sector added 17,000 jobs and hospitals added 6,000.

Bureau of Labor Statistics  data show that health care created 169,800 jobs in the first half of 2012 and accounted for one out of every five new jobs created this year

The goods and services hospitals purchase from other businesses create additional economic value for the community. With these "ripple effects" included, each hospital job supports about two more jobs and every dollar spent by a hospital supports roughly $2.30 of additional business activity.

Arkansas hospitals contributed an estimated $10.3 billion to the economy in 2010, according to a new report by the Arkansas Hospital Association. The hospitals directly employ 42,300 people and indirectly support another 32,700 jobs for a combined payroll effect of $4.9 billion. In addition, they support the purchase of $4.9 billion in goods and services, and nearly $459 million in capital spending. The report concludes that hospitals are "instrumental to supporting the state and local economy" and urges lawmakers to "continue to invest in our state's health care system."

The goods and services hospitals purchase from other businesses create additional economic value for the community. With these “ripple effects” included, each hospital job supports about two more jobs, and every dollar spent by a hospital supports roughly $2.30 of additional business activity.

In 2011 the community benefit contributions of Iowa hospitals exceeded $1.47 billion.  Through a wide range of hospital community outreach activities, more than 6.2 million Iowans were served by community service programs.

In 2011 the health care sector grew more than any other sector in the United States, creating 20% of new jobs. Hospitals added 89,000 jobs.

Hospitals and hospital related spending in the City and County of San Francisco generate $15.3 billion in spending annually and generate 98,994 jobs, about 18 percent of San Francisco's workforce.

The total employment impact of hospital systems in New Hampshire is 65,651 direct and secondary jobs, earning a total of $3.7 billion. Hospital system employees earn about $2.3 billion a year in wages, salaries and benefits, while secondary jobs related to community hospitals earn $1.3 billion a year.

Hospitals in Northeast Ohio directly employ more than 81,000 people, and their 2010 construction projects employed another almost 4,000 people. Altogether, these 85,000 people earned almost $5.9 billion in salaries and benefits in 2010.

The Hospital Council of Northern and Central California estimates that hospital-related spending in the San Joaquin Valley generates $6.8 billion in spending annually and 52,101 jobs.

During a time when Georgia’s economy continued to suffer, a new report shows that, in 2010, Georgia hospitals provided the state a much-needed $38 billion economic boost. The report, commissioned by the Georgia Hospital Association also showed that with the state’s unemployment rate hovering around 10% at that time, hospitals accounted for more than 337,000 full-time jobs.

Beaver Dam Community Hospital generated $28 billion annually in economic activity to the Wisconsin economy and employed more than 110,000 people in communities throughout the state in 2011.

In Kansas, the hospital sector employed an average of 73,890 people in 2010-11.  Additionally, for each job created in the hospital sector, another 0.78 jobs were supported in other businesses and industries in the state’s economy. The direct impact of the 73,890 hospital employees resulted in an indirect impact of 57,330 jobs throughout all businesses and industries in the state. Thus, hospital sector employment had a total impact on state employment of 131,220 jobs.

Pennsylvania’s hospitals are cornerstones of their communities, accounting for nearly 600,000 jobs and providing a $100 billion boost to the economy.

Rhode Island hospitals employ 21,400 health care professionals, with a total payroll of $1.8 billion. These jobs account for more than 6% of the state’s private-sector employment.

Collectively, acute care hospitals in Oregon directly generated 59,580 full- and part-time jobs in 2010. Through supply-chain and consumption-driven effects, this direct employment is linked to another 69,790 jobs in other sectors of the Oregon economy. In total, acute care hospitals in Oregon were associated with 129,370 full- and part-time jobs in Oregon in 2010.

In southeast Pennsylvania, one in 10 jobs is hospital-related. In 2010, the region's 60 hospital facilities and 97,340 employees contributed $28.7 billion to the local economy.

Hospitals employ more than 5.4 million people and are the second- largest source of private- sector jobs.

Iowa’s Finley Hospital creates a $62 million impact on the local economy and generates more than 800 jobs. Hospital employees by themselves spend more than $21 million on retail sales and contribute $231,093 in state sales tax revenue.

Colorado hospitals contributed $18.8 billion to the Colorado economy in 2010.  Additionally, Colorado hospitals directly employed 71,700 people in 2010, and spending by both hospitals and their employees helped create another 61,400 Colorado jobs.

Carondelet Health provided more than $22 million in unreimbursed care in 2011 including offering free wellness services to low-income patients.

Kansas hospitals employ 73,890 people and support another 57,330 jobs throughout the state. Hospitals directly and indirectly generate nearly $6.3 billion in income, $2 billion in retail sales, and $125 million in sales tax for the state each year.

In 2010, Sentara Healthcare returned more than $179.4 million to communities across Virginia through uncompensated patient care services, training the future health care workforce and touching individuals with health information, screenings and prevention in their local communities.

The Michigan Health & Hospital Association has announced that health care provides more than half a million direct jobs statewide, with hospitals alone employing nearly 222,000 of those individuals. Michigan’s direct health care jobs generated more than $31 billion in wages, salaries and benefits in 2010, with health care workers paying local, state and federal taxes to the sum of $7.4 billion.

Illinois’ 200 hospitals and health systems contribute $78.7 billion to the state’s economy, according to a new report by the Illinois Hospital Association. The hospitals employ more than a quarter of a million people and expend $15.4 billion a year on wages and benefits, resulting in 422,575 direct and indirect jobs.

Iowa's community hospitals generate more than 136,000 jobs that add nearly $6.2 billion to the state's economy. The state's hospitals provide $3.9 billion in salaries and benefits and generate another $2.3 billion through other jobs that depend on hospitals.

Mississippi hospitals generate $11.9 billion for the state's economy, according to a new report prepared for the Mississippi Hospital Association. That includes 94,700 direct and indirect jobs.

The construction of Rust Medical Center in New Mexico and its physician's office building brought a total of 2,500 construction jobs to Rio Rancho over two years. The hospital currently has more than 400 permanent employees, with a $50 million annual payroll.

MD Anderson Cancer Center provided $326 million in unsponsored charity care to Texans with cancer in 2010 and employed 18,000 people with 1,200 volunteers who logged more than 195,000 hours of service in 2010.

Baylor Regional Medical Center at Grapevine, Texas will generate over $227 million in economic activity for the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. This activity will support more than 3,300 direct, indirect and induced jobs paying over $138 million in annual earnings.

Connecticut hospitals contribute nearly $17.6 billion annually to the state and local economies and employ 97,000 people.

Louisiana's 228 hospitals provided jobs for 99,351 people with an annual payroll of almost $4.4 billion. Healthcare employment in Louisiana has risen by 11,240 jobs in two years from 2008 to 2010, despite the fact that overall employment in the state was declining.

Hospitals are the largest component of the health care sector and in total employ over 5.4 million people - the second largest source of private sector jobs. Hospitals have provided steady growth during the most recent downturn, creating over 74,000 jobs over the past year alone.

Wisconsin hospitals generated $28 billion annually in economic activity and employed more than 110,000 people

Rhode Island hospitals' estimated economic impact in 2009 was more than $6.3 billion and accounted for 39,200 jobs.

Florida hospitals are responsible for creating 739,078 jobs and generate $54 billion in total economic contributions statewide.

Oregon hospitals  reported more than $1.5 billion in community benefits in 2009. About $1.2 billion was for uncompensated care, which includes charity care as well as unreimbursed care provided to patients in Medicare, Medicaid and other public health insurance programs.

St. Anthony Hospital  in Colorado created 2,400 jobs when it opened this summer and is expected to pump $336 million into the local economy each year.

Georgia hospitals employ 141,000 people and pay salaries and benefits totaling $7.9 billion annually and provided $1.9 billion in uncompensated care in 2009.

Indiana hospitals employ more than 120,000 people and the payroll of the hospitals is approximately $4.6 billion.

As of 2009, Alabama's hospitals  employed 81,491 individuals. This includes full- and part-time employees. If you look at the other non-hospital jobs created as a result of the hospital's presence in the community (jobs in doctor's offices, dialysis clinics, medical supply companies, etc.), it's estimated that there are another 79,518 jobs created statewide.

Ohio hospitals provided 2.9 billion in community benefits beyond health care. Every dollar hospitals spend generates an additional $1.23 in the state's economy. Hospitals also care for more than 1.5 million inpatients, 34.2 million outpatients and 6 million emergency room patients each year.

Ohio hospitals provided 2.9 billion in community benefits beyond health care. Every dollar hospitals spend generates an additional $1.23 in the state's economy. Hospitals also care for more than 1.5 million inpatients, 34.2 million outpatients and 6 million emergency room patients each year.

Nebraska hospitals are economic engines - supporting more than 71,000 jobs, directly and indirectly - providing stability and growth in the state, even when the economic recession is affecting their own financial stability.

In 2009 Minnesota hospitals provided 3.2 billion in community benefits beyond health care.

In 2010 New Jersey hospitals provided $2.7 billion in community benefits beyond health care. The total includes the value of free and discounted care for the poor, uninsured and senior citizens; community health offerings like immunization clinics and other wellness programs; education for future health care professionals; medical research; and a wide array of additional community programs.

Illinois hospitals pump $75.1 billion annually into the state's economy and employ more than a quarter of a million employees.

New York hospitals generate some 108 billion for the state and local economies each year.

New report from the American Hospital Association finds that hospitals supported one in nine U.S. jobs and more than $2.2 trillion in economic activity in 2009.

Vermont hospitals directly or indirectly support more than 27,000 jobs or one in twelve jobs within the state.

According to Job Service of North Dakota, health care and social assistance represents the state's largest employment sector. Roughly 16% of all workers in North Dakota are employed by a health care organization.

The economic contributions made by Pennsylvania's hospitals to local communities and the state have continued to increase, rising to $98.9 billion during 2010, up from $89.8 billion during 2008.

Kentucky hospitals are responsible for generating approximately $2.8 billion in local economic activity from the purchases they make and those made by their employees.

Roughly one-eighth of Missouri's economy can be traced back to its hospitals

New Jersey is home to 73 acute care hospitals. In 2009, New Jersey hospitals delivered over $18 billion in total expenditures, $2.3 billion in purchased services, and provided nearly $1.4 billion in charity care services to New Jersey's working poor and other uninsured residents.

Ohio is home to 181 hospitals. Hospitals and health systems make a $67.8 billion impact on Ohio's economy and provided $2.6 billion in benefit to their community above and beyond the health care services they provide to their patients.

Hospitals support nearly one of 9 jobs in the U.S.

Every dollar spent by a hospital supports roughly $2.30 of additional business activity.

Hospitals support over 2 trillion dollars of economic activity.

The IHA Hospital Economic Impact Report: Iowa hospitals provide more than 70,000 jobs that pay nearly $3.8 billion in salaries and benefits. This makes hospitals the ninth largest non-agricultural employer in Iowa.

New Jersey is home to 73 acute care hospitals. In 2009, New Jersey hospitals delivered over $18 billion in total expenditures, $2.3 billion in purchased services, and provided nearly $1.4 billion in charity care services to New Jersey's working poor and other uninsured residents.

Economic Contribution of Hospitals

Making Health Care More Affordable

 

 

 

 

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