Scanning the Headlines: Patient Safety (Archive) 2005


Updated on July 8, 2009

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Links to full-text articles are provided where available.
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Cummings, J., and others.  Bar-coding medication administration overview and consensus recommendations.  American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy (AJHP).  62(24):2626-2629, Dec. 15, 2005.

Longo, D., Hewett, J., and Schubert, S.  The long road to patient safety:  a status report on patient safety systems.  JAMA.  294(22):2858-2865, Dec. 14, 2005.

Creamer, J., and Elliot, P.  Embedded coaches lead to CPOE victory.  Health Management Technology.  26(12):26-28, Dec. 2005.

McBride, M., editor.  Raising the bar.  Health Management Technology.  26(12):32-33, Dec. 2005.

O'Flaherty, N., and others.  How FDA hopes to decrease medical errors with the help of bar code technology.  Health Lawyers News.  9(12):4-10, Dec. 2005.

Seeking a just culture to design a safet hospital environment.  Quality Letter for Healthcare Leaders.  17(12):8-10, Dec. 2005.

Crosby, C.  Hand hygiene:  are we doing better?  Healthcare Purchasing News.  29(12):36-37, Dec. 2005.

Involving patients in stroke care.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(12):1-2, 4, Dec. 2005.

Turning on anesthesia alarms.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(12):3, Dec. 2005.

Defensive medicine.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(12):5, Dec. 2005.

No excuses for not improving patient safety.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(12):6-7, Dec. 2005.

Woods, D., and others.  Anatomy of a patient safety event:  a pediatric patient safety.  Quality & Safety in Health Care.  14(6):422-427, Dec. 2005.

Weiner, S.  Radiology by nonradiologists:  is report documentation adequate?  American Journal of Managed Care.  11(12):781-785, Dec. 2005.

Patient safety taxonomy approved.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(12):8, Dec. 2005.

Sharing information at transfers.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(12):9-10, Dec. 2005.

Surgical care improvement project.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(12):11, Dec. 2005.

Medication errors.  HealthLeaders.  8(12):Insert, Dec. 2005.

Maulik, J., and others.  A comprehensive grassroots model for statewide safety improvement.  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.  31(12):671-677, Dec. 2005.

Quinn, M., and Mannion, J.  Improving patient safety using interactive, evidence-based decision support tools.  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.  31(12):678-683, Dec. 2005.

Schmidek, J., and Weeks. W.  What do we know about financial returns on investments in patient safety?  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.  31(12):690-699, Dec. 2005.

Yates, G., and others.  Building and sustaining a systemwide culture of safety.  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.  31(12):684-689, Dec. 2005.

Thompson, P., Navarra, M., and Antonson, N.  Patient safety:  the four domains of nursing leadership.  Nursing Economics.  23(6):331-333, Nov./Dec. 2005.

Cutler, D., Feldman, N., and Horwitz, J.  U.S. adoption of computerized physician order entry systems.  Health Affairs.  24(6):1654-1663, Nov./Dec. 2005.

Haig, K.  Culture improves safety:  reducing adverse drug events.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.  2(6):22-25, Nov./Dec. 2005.

Dotan, D.  Patient safety officers:  roles and responsibilities.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.  2(6):32-34, Nov./Dec. 2005.

Sabharwal, A.  New roles improve bed utilization.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.  2(6):36-38, Nov./Dec. 2005.

Wolosin, R., Vercler, L., and Matthews, J.  How safe do patients feel?  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.   2(6):40-44, Nov./Dec. 2005.

Woods, M.  What if we just said, "I'm sorry"?  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.  2(6):46-48, Nov./Dec. 2005.

Burke, M.  Informed consent enters a new age.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.  2(6):52-53, Nov./Dec. 2005.

Roleti, R.  Leading the way to safer, more effective care.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.  2(6):54-55, Nov./Dec. 2005

Carroll, V.  Is patient safety synonymous with quality nursing care?  should it be?  a brief discourse.  Quality Management in Health Care.  14(4):229-233, Oct./Dec. 2005.

Pratt, N., Thomas, L., and Atkins, P.  Measure patient harm in real time.  Nursing Management.  36(11):17-19, Nov. 2005.

Joch, A.  Keeping tabs on product recall alerts.  Materials Management in Health Care.  14(11);30-32, Nov. 2005.

Toft, B., and Taylor, H.  Involuntary automaticity:  a work-system induced risk to safe health care.  Health Services Management Research.  18(4):211-216, Nov. 2005.

Sharps safety.  Materials Management in Health Care.  14(11);34, Nov. 2005.

Baldwin, G.  Bringing order to CPOE.  HealthLeaders.  8(11):24-36, Nov. 2005.

Prisoners, guns can be deadly combination in the emergency room.  Ed Management.  17(11):121-123, Nov. 2005.

Gandhi, T.  Closing the loop:  follow-up and feedback in a patient safety program.  Joint Commisssion Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.  31(11):614-621, Nov. 2005.

Santell, J., and Cousins, D.  Medication errors related to product names.  Joint Commisssion Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.  31(11):649-653, Nov. 2005.

Patient-inclusive care.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(11):1-2, 8, Nov. 2005.

Putting an end to do-not-use abbreviations.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(11):3-4, Nov. 2005.

Actionable error reporting systems.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(11):5-6, Nov. 2005.

Improving medication adherence.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(11):9-10, Nov. 2005.

Yu, K., Nation, R., and Dooley, M.  Multiplicity of medication safety terms, definitions and functional meanings:  when is enough enough?  Quality & Safety in Health Care.   14(5):358-363, Oct. 2005.

Colla, J., and others.  Measuring patient safety climate:  a review of surveys.  Quality & Safety in Health Care.   14(5):364-366, Oct. 2005.

Murphree, J., and others.  North Mississippi Medical Center:  a focus on quality, safety, and financial critical success factors.  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.   31(10);545-553, Oct. 2005.

Johnson, T., and others.  New York-Presbyterian Hospital:  translating innovation into practice.  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.   31(10);554-560, Oct. 2005.

Bukunt, S., and others.  El Camino Hospital:  using health information technology to promote patient safety.  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.   31(10);561-565, Oct. 2005.

Anthony, R., and others.  Lehigh Valley Hospital:  engaging patients and familiesl  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.   31(10);566-572, Oct. 2005.

Adamski, P.  Medication management:  a patient safety priority.  Nursing Management.   36(10):14, Oct. 2005.

Earsing, K., Hobson, D., and White, K.  Preventing central line infection.  Nursing Management.   36(10):18-24, Oct. 2005.

Fontaine, D., and Gerardi, D.  Healthier hospitals?  Nursing Management.   36(10):35-43, Oct. 2005.

Thompson, D., and others.  Integrating the intensive care unit safety reporting system with existing incident reporting systems.  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.   31(10);585-593, Oct. 2005.

Glenister, H.  Patient safety in England and Wales:  developing solutions to promote safer practice.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(5):22-26, Sept./Oct. 2005.

Cummings, J., Ratko, T., and Matuszewski, K.  Barcoding to enhance.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(5):29-33, Sept./Oct. 2005.

Inglesby, J., and T.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(5):35-37, Sept./Oct. 2005.

Moher, R., and Wilson, K.  Labeling and tracking proventing errors in the lab.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(5):42-44, Sept./Oct. 2005.

The case for medication reconciliation.  Nursing Management.   36(9):22, Sept. 2005.

Weir, V.  Best-practice protocols:  preventing adverse drug events.  Nursing Management.   36(9):24-30, Sept. 2005.

Wu, H., Nishimi, R., and Page-Lopes, C.  Improving Patient Safety through Informed Consent for Patients with Limited Health Literacy: An Implementation Report.  National Quality Forum.    Sept. 2005.   Executive Summary.  User’s Guide for Health Professionals.

Getting your hands on a culture of safety.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.    5(10):1-2, 8, Aug. 2005.

The prerequisite label.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.    5(10):3-4, Aug. 2005.

Information override.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.    5(10):5-6, Aug. 2005.

Purposeful patient safety committees.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.    5(10):7-8, Aug. 2005.

Reducing the risk of falls in hospice.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.    5(10):9-10, Aug. 2005.

World health organization partners with Joint Commission and Joint Commission International to eliminate medical errors worldwide.  Joint Commission Perspectives.    25(10):1, 10, Oct. 2005.

Revisions to the sentinel event policy.  Joint Commission Perspectives.    25(10):4-5, Oct. 2005.

Executive walkrounds boost safety and satisfaction.  Healthcare Market Stretegist.    6(10):1, 15-16, Oct. 2005.

Curtis, E.  Physician order entry goes online.  Journal of  AHIMA.    76(9):60-69, Oct. 2005.

May, E.  The transformational power of IT:  experience from patient safety leaders.  Healthcare Executive.    20(5):8-13, Sept./Oct. 2005.

Bensen, H.  Chaos and complexity:  applications for healthcare quality and patient safety.  Journal for Healthcare Quality.    27(5):4-10, Sept./Oct. 2005.

Triller, D., Clause, S., and Hamilton, R.  Risk of adverse drug events by patient destination after hospital discharge.  American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy.    62(18):1883-1889, Sept. 15, 2005.

Lee, D.  Health group's triage:  safety first.  The Indianapolis Star.    Sept. 14, 2005.

Proven strategies for reconciling medications.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.    5(9):3-4, Sept. 2005.

Examining inpatient pediatric falls.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.    5(9):5-6, Sept. 2005.

Larson, L.  Have you M.E.T. the future of better patient safety?  Trustee.    58(8):6-10, Sept. 2005.

Santell, J., and Cousins, D.  Medication errors involving wrong administration technique.  Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.    31(9):528-532, Sept. 2005.

Elixhauser, A., Pancholi, M., and Clancy, C.  Using the AHRQ  quality indicators to improve health care quality.  Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.    31(9):533-538, Sept. 2005.

Odwazny, R., and others.  Organizational and cultural changes for providing safe patient care.  Quality Management in Health Care.    14(3):132-143, July/Sept. 2005.

Englebright, J., and Franklin, M.  Managing a new medication administration process.  Journal of Nursing Administration (JONA).    35(9):410-413, Sept. 2005.

Comm, J.  It's one step toward quality.  Modern Healthcare.    35(32):6-7, 16, Aug. 8, 2005.

Medication safety issue brief.  Hospitals & Healthcare Networks.    79(8):29-30, Aug. 2005.

Ursprung, R., and others.  Real time patient safety audits:  improving safety every day.  Quality & Safety in Health Care.    14(4):284-289, Aug. 2005.

Wilson, K., and others.  Promoting health care safety through training high reliability teams.  Quality & Safety in Health Care.    14(4):303-309, Aug. 2005.

Pronovost, P., and Sexton, B.  Assessing safety culture:  guidelines and recommendations.  Quality & Safety in Health Care.    14(4):231-233, Aug. 2005.

Surveyors want to see patient safety culture.  Hospital Peer Review.    30(8):111-112, Aug. 2005.

Can quality software put your patients in danger?  Hospital Peer Review.    30(8):107, Aug. 2005.

Special report!  helpful solutions for meeting the 2006 national patient safety goals.  Joint Commissions Perspectives on Patient Safety.    5(8):1-3, Aug. 2005.

Frankel, A., and others.  Patient safety leadership walkrounds TM at partners healthcare:  learning from implementation.  Journal of Quality and Patient Safety.   31(8):423-437, Aug. 2005.

Retained objects now considered reviewable.  Healthcare Risk Management.  27(8):92, Aug. 2005.

Patient handoff must  be more than a formality.  Healthcare Risk Management.  27(8):93, Aug. 2005.

Handoff information should cover past, future.  Healthcare Risk Management.  27(8):94, Aug. 2005.

CMS details 'oily' instrument error at Duke.  OR Manager.    21(8):5-7, Aug. 2005.

Strategies for improving OR handoffs. OR Manager.    21(8):9, Aug. 2005.

Handoffs:  lessons form other industries.  OR Manager.    21(8):11-12, Aug. 2005.

Ginsburg, L., and others.  An educational intervention to enhance nurse leaders' perceptions of patient safety culture.  Health Services Research.    40(4):997-1020, Aug. 2005.

Daniels, D., and Rapala, K.  Aiming for zero errors.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(4):14-20, July/Aug. 2005.

Vanderveen, T.  Averting highest-risk errors is first priority.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(4):22-26, July/Aug. 2005.

Powell, S., Hoskins, R., and Sanders, W.  Improving patient safety and quality of care using aviation CRM.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(4):28-33, July/Aug. 2005.

Daily, M.  Keeping patients safe and promoting quality outcomes.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(4):34-37, July/Aug. 2005.

Runy, L.  25 simple steps to save patients' lives.  Trustee.    58(7):12-14, 19-21, July/Aug. 2005.

Lazarus, A.  Impact of formulary restrictions on patient safety.  Physician Executive.    31(4):42-44, July/Aug. 2005.

Old, L.  Developing a detailed infection control work plan for your healthcare construction project.  Inside ASHE.    13(4):14-17, July/Aug. 2005.

Wright, A., and Katz, I.  Bar coding for patient safety.  The New England Journal of Medicine.    353(4):329-331, July 28, 2005.

Jha, A., and others.  Care in U.S. hospitals - the hospital quality alliance program.  New England Journal of Medicine.     353(3):265-274, July 21, 2005.

Williams, S., and others.  Quality of care in U.S. hospitals as reflected by standardized measures, 2002-2004.  New England Journal of Medicine.    353(3):255-264, July 21, 2005.

Romero, A., and Malone, D.  Accuracy of adverse-drug-event reports collected using an automated dispensing system.  American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy.    62(13):1375-1380. July 1, 2005.

Sales, E., and others.  Using simulation-based training to improve patient safety:  what does it take?  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.   31(7):363-371, July 2005.

Zhan, C., and others.  Ambulatory care visits for treating adverse drug effects in the United States, 1995-2001.  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.   31(7):372-378, July 2005.

Kovner, C., Menezes, J., and Goldberg, J.  Examining nurses' decision process for medication management in home care.  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.   31(7):379-385, July 2005.

Cohen, M., and Smetzer, J.  Unlabeled containers lead to patient's death.  Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.   31(7):414-417, July 2005.

Using electronic medical records to improve care.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.    5(7):1-2, 8, July 2005.

Consistently reporting sentinel events.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.    5(7):5-6, July 2005.

Comply with unapproved abbreviations requirement.  Medical Records Briefing.    20(7):10-11, July 2005.

Making the healthcare system safer with innovation and technology.  Quality Letter for Healthcare Leaders.    17(7):2-11, July 2005.

Waton, K.  CPOE makes smooth "doc-ing".  Health Management Technology.    26(7):16-18, July 2005.

Buerhaus, L., and Davidoff, F.  Link seen between OR schedule, safety. OR Manager.    21(7):5, July 2005. 

Building a memory: preventing harm, reducing risks and improving patient safety.  London:  National Health Service, The National Patient Safety Agency, July 2005.

JCAHO's safety goals-the clock is ticking, will your ED be compliant?  Ed Management.    17(1):73-75, July 2005.

Hader, R.  Best-practice protocols: every second counts.  Nursing Management.    36(6):28-33, June 2005.

Kerfoot, K.  Offer "safe passage" to patients.  Nursing Management.    36(6):36-40, June 2005.

Gathering information for the universal protocol.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(6):5-6, June 2005.

Moving to standardized concentrations.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(6):7-8, June 2005.

Accurately reconciling patient medications.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.  5(6):9-10, June 2005.

Joint Commission International Centers for patient safety offers new web site.  Joint Commission Perspectives.    25(6):1-2, June 2005.

Runy L.  The low-hanging fruit:  25 ways lives can be saved.  Materials Management in Health Care.    14(6):22-29, June 2005.

Cohen, M., and others.  Medication safety program reduces adverse drug events in a community hospital.  Quality & Safety in Health Care.    14(3):169-174, June 2005.

West, J., and others.  Do clinical trails improve quality of care?  a comparison of clinical processes and outcomes in patients in clinical trial and similar patients outside a trial where both groups are managed according to a strict protocol.  Quality & Safety in Health Care.    14(3):175-178, June 2005.

Cousins, D., and others.  Medication errors in intravenous drug preparation and administration:  a muticentre audit in the UK, Germany and France.  Quality & Safety in Health Care.    14(3):190-195, June 2005.

Lankshear, A., and others.  Evaluation of the implementation of the alert issued by the UK National Patient Safety Agency on the storage and handling of potassium chloride concentrate solution.  Quality & Safety in Health Care.    14(3):196-201, June 2005.

Edworthy, J., and Hellier, E.  Fewer but better auditory alarms will improve patient safety.  Quality & Safety in Health Care.    14(3):212-215, June 2005.

Betbeze, P.  Germ Crunching.  HealthLeaders.    8(6):57-58, June 2005.

Flowers, L.  Being open about errors is norm at Children's Hospital.  OR Manager.  21(6):14-16, June 2005.

Santell, J., and Hicks, R.  Medication errors involving pediatric patients.  Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.    31(6):348-353, June 2005.

"Simple, complex' model for safe performance.  Occupational Health Management.    15(6):68-69, June 2005.

Harrington, M.  Revisiting medical error:  five years after the IOM report, have reporting systems made a measurable difference?  Health Matrix:  Journal of Law-Medicine.    15(2):329-382, Summer 2005.

MGMA Government Affairs Department.  MGMA board approves pay-for-performance principles.  MGMA Connexion.    5(5):20-22, May/June 2005.

Shea, B., and Lowenhaupt, M.  Patient safety:  it's not just about the technology...  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(3):10-12, May/June 2005.

Vanderveen, T.  Averting highest-risk errors is first priority.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(3):16-21, May/June 2005.

Sparkes, W., and Pronovost, P.  Getting to the recall on time:  improve safety with automated recall management.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(3):22-26, May/June 2005

Work, M.  Improving medication safety with a wireless, mobile barcode system in a community hospital.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(3):34-38, May/June 2005

Davis, T.  100,000 lives campaign adds 1,700 hospitals...and counting.  The Physician Executive.    31(3):20-23, May/June, 2005.

Oliva, J.  Consumer directed health care:  zeroing in on physician practices.  The Physician Executive.    31(3):66-68, May/June, 2005.

Nadzam, D., and others.  Cleveland clinic health system:  a comprehensive framework for a health system patient safety initiative.  Quality Management in Health Care.    14(2):80-90, Apr./June, 2005.

Khare, R., Uren, B., and Wears, R.  Capturing more emergency department errors via an anonymous web-based reporting system.  Quality Management in Health Care.    14(2):91-94, Apr./June, 2005.

Langowski, C.  The times they are a changing:  effects of online nursing documentation systems.  Quality Management in Health Care.    14(2):121-125, Apr./June, 2005.

Adachi, W., and Lodolce, A.  Use of failure mode and effects analysis in imporving the safety of i.v. drug administration.  American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy.    62(9):917-920, May 1, 2005.

Diamond, F., editor.  Hospitals may see plans as their new confidant.  Managed Care.    14(5):35-41, May 2005.

The Joint Commission's sentinel event policy:  ten years of improving the quality and safety of health care.  Joint Commission Perspectives.    25(5):1, 3-5, May 2005.

Medical liability system hinders improvements in patient safety:  Joint Commission expert panel offers solutions to crisis.  Joint Commission Perspectives.    25(5):9-10, May 2005.

Eagle, A.  Infection connection.  Health Facilities Management.    18(5):14-20, May 2005.

Jimmerson, C., Weber, D., and Sobek, D.  Reducing waste and errors:  piloting lean principles at Intermountain Healthcare.  Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.    31(5):249-257, May 2005.

Gering, J., and others.  Taking a patient safety approach to an integration of two hospitals.  Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.    31(5):258-266, May 2005.

Spear, S., and Schmidhofer, M.  Ambiguity and workarounds as contributors to medical error.  Annals of Internal Medicine.    142(8):627-630, Apr. 19, 2005.

Robeznieks, A. JCAHO to launch global patient safety center.  American Medical News, Apr. 18, 2005. 

Announcing the new Joint Commission International Center for Patient Safety.  Joint Commission Perspectives.    25(4):1-2, Apr. 2005.

Hofler, L.  Public reporting, patient safety, and quality improvment.  Journal of Nursing Administration.    35(4):161-162, Apr. 2005.

Runy, L.  25 things you can do to save lives now.  Hospital & Health Networks.    79(4):40-48, Apr. 2005.

Mycek, S.  Pushing patient safety.  Materials Management in Health Care.    14(4):32-36, Apr. 2005.

Bates, D., and others.  Variability in intravenous medication practices:  implications for medication safety.  Journal of Quality and Patient Safety.    31(4):203-210, Apr. 2005.

Santell, J., and Hicks, R.  Medication errors involving geriatric patients.  Journal of Quality and Patient Safety.    31(4):233-238, Apr. 2005.

Husch, M., and others.  Insights form the sharp end of intravenous medication errors:  implications for infusion pump technology.  Quality and Safety in Health Care.    14(2):80-86, Apr. 2005.

Hignett, S., and Griffiths, P.  Do split-side rails present and increased risk to patient safety?  Quality and Safety in Health Care.    14(2):113-116, Apr. 2005.

Technology in patient safety:  using identification bands to reduce patient identifiction errors.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.    5(4):1-2, Apr. 2005.

Joint Commission news:  definition of reviewable sentinel event expanded.  Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety.    5(4):8, Apr. 2005.

Cook, R., and Rasmussen, J.  "Going solid":  a model of system dynamics and consequences for patient safety.  Quality and Safety in Health Care.    14(2):130-134, Apr. 2005.

Lewis, R., and Fletcher, M.  Implementing a national strategy for patient safety:  lessons from the National Health Service in England.  Quality and Safety in Health Care.    14(2):135-139, Apr. 2005.

Mireles, M.  The patient in patient safety.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(2):21-22, 25-26, Mar./Apr. 2005.

Mazer, S.  Stop the noise.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(2):36-39, Mar./Apr. 2005.

Bennett, A.  Defining patient safety.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.    2(2):50, Mar./Apr. 2005.

Jones, F.  Failure mode effects analysis.  Inside ASHE.    13(2):37-42, Mar./Apr. 2005.

Solomon, P., and Denny, D.  A real-time medical event reporting and prevention system in long-term care.  Journal for Healthcare Quality.    27(2):4-11, 19, Mar./Apr. 2005.

Scarrow, P., and Routon, C.  Michael Cohen on medication error reporting and patient safety.  Journal for Healthcare Quality.    27(2):29-36, Mar./Apr. 2005.

Hambleton, M.  Applying root cause analysis and failure mode and effect analysis to our compliance programs.  Journal of Health Care Compliance.    7(2):5-12, Mar./Apr. 2005.

Ron, J.  97.1 percent perfect:  healthcare leadership's pinto.  Journal of Healthcare Management.    50(2):87-93, Mar./Apr. 2005.

Westat.  Comparing Your Results: Preliminary Benchmarks on the Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC).  Mar. 24, 2005.

Weisman, J.  Error reporting and disclosure systems.  views from hospital leaders.  JAMA.    293(11):1359-1366, Mar. 16, 2005.

Conn, J.  Defending CPOE.  Modern Healthcare.    35(11):10, Mar. 14, 2005.

Koppel, R, and others. Role of computerized physician order entry systems in facilitating medication errors. JAMA. 293(10):1197-1203, Mar. 9, 2005. 

Davies, P.  Computers to cut medical mistakes may trigger some.  The Wall Street Journal.    :D9, Mar. 9, 2005.

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.  New AHRQ-funded study on computerized order entry finds flaws that could lead to errors, points to opportunities for improvement.  Press Release, Mar. 8, 2005.

Gurwitz, J.H., and others. The incidence of adverse drug events in two large academic long-term care facilities. American Journal of Medicine. 118(3):251-258, Mar. 2005. 

Study: infighting among doctors and nurses is frequent and harms patients. Healthcare Risk Management, Mar. 2005.

Most ED patients feel safe, but many fear errors.  ED Management.    17(3):33-34, Mar. 2005.

Joint commission partners with IHI in 100,000 lives campaign.  Joint Commission Perspectives.    25(3):1, Mar. 2005.

Paying lip service to patient safety:  better communication, improved work environment seen as lowering medical errors.  The Quality Letter for Healthcare Leaders.    17(3):2-5, 8-10, Mar. 2005.

Risk, K., and others.  Can an algorithm for appropriate prescribing predict adverse drug events?  American Journal of Managed Care.    11(3):145-151, Mar. 2005.

Dispensing machines and med errors.  OR Manager.   21(3):8-9, Mar. 2005.

Santell, J.P., Cousins, D.D., and Hicks R. Medication error trends for 1999-2003. Drug Topics, Feb. 21, 2005. http://www.drugtopics.com/drugtopics/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=147658

Medical errors still occurring despite use of new technology.  Materials Management in Health Care.   14(2):5, Feb. 2005.

Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Strategies for combating anesthesia awareness. Joint Commission: The Source. 3(2), Feb. 2005.  http://www.jcrinc.com/publications.asp?durki=9260&site=4&return=9258 

Reason, J.  Safety in the operating theatre - part 2:  human error and organisational failure.  Quality & Safety in Health Care.   14(1):56-61, Feb. 2005.

The end of the beginning:  patient safety five years after to err is human.  Healthcare Leadership Review.   24(2):6, Feb. 2005.

Pope, C.  Quality quagmire:  why systems and processes are important to your practice but often ignored.  MGMA Connexion.   5(2):40-45, Feb. 2005.

Health Care at the Crossroads: Strategies for Improving the Medical Liability System and Preventing Patient Injury. Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations.  Feb. 2005.

http://www.jcaho.org/about+us/public+policy+initiatives/medical_liability.pdf

Hanna, D., and others.  Communicating critical test results:  safe practice recommendations.  Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.   31(2):68-69, Feb. 2005.

Graber, M.  Diagnostic errors in medicine:  a case of neglect.  Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.   31(2):106-111, Feb. 2005.

Stevenson, J.  Medication errors:  experience of the United States pharmacopeia (USP).  Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.   31(2):114-119, Feb. 2005.

Rogoski, R.  Putting patients first.  Health Management Technology.   26(2):12-18, Feb. 2005.

Rosen, A.  Physicians' view of interventions to reduce medical errors:  does evidence of effectiveness matter?  Academic Medicine.   (80):189-192, Feb. 2005.

Kenney, L., and Pelt, R.  To err is human; the need for trauma support is, too.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.  2(1):6-9, Jan./Feb. 2005.

Long, M.  How pass addresses patient safety across the hospital enterprise.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.  2(1):20-23, Jan./Feb. 2005.

Avery, J., Beyea, S., and Campion, P.  Active error management.  Journal of Nursing Administration.   35(2):81-85, Feb. 2005.

Lohnes, M.  CPOE at a community hospital:  beyond the hospital walls.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.  2(1):24-25, Jan./Feb. 2005.

Welsh, A., Frost, M., and Weepie, N.  Patient safety simulations:  driver of cross-functional collaboration.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.  2(1):26-28, Jan./Feb. 2005.

Denham, C.  Partnering with suppliers to improve patient safety.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.  2(1):38-40, Jan./Feb. 2005.

Collier, S.  Patient safety in American hospitals:  the consumer has the right to know.  Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare.  2(1):41-42, Jan./Feb. 2005.

Cornett-Sutherland, B., and Helder, A.  Under the microscope:  the government's heightened scrutiny of health care quality.  Journal of Health Care Compliance.   7(1):13-20, Jan. 2005.

Kowalczyk, L.  Hospital group to detail safety plan, initiative aims to improve care and reduce errors.  Boston Globe.   Jan. 26, 2005. 

Robeznieks, A. Data entry is a top cause of medcation errors: training and design are seen as keys to reducing electronic prescribing errors. American Medical News, Jan. 24, 2005.  http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2005/01/24/prsa0124.htm

Evans, M.  Show and tell.  Modern Healthcare.   35(4):10-11, Jan. 24, 2005.

Finkelstein, J.B. Patient safety laboratories: states pave way for national effort. American Medical News, Jan. 3/10, 2005.  http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2005/01/03/gvsa0103.htm

Robeznieks,  A. Hospital patient safety effort launched to reduce errors, save lives.  American Medical News, Jan. 3/10, 2005.

Minnesota Department of Health. Adverse Health Events in Minnesota Hospitals: First Annual Public Report. St. Paul, MN: MDH, Jan. 2005.  http://www.health.state.mn.us/patientsafety/aereport0105.pdf

The IOM medical errors report:  5 years later, the journey continues.  The Quality Letter for Healthcare Leaders.  17(1):2-9, Jan. 2005.

IHI proposes six patient safety goals to prevent 100,000 annual deaths.  The Quality Letter for Healthcare Leaders.  17(1):11-12, Jan. 2005.

JCAHO announces eighth annual Codman award winners.  The Quality Letter for Healthcare Leaders.  17(1):12-16, Jan. 2005.

Conn, J.  Dealing with errors.  Modern Healthcare.  35(1):12-13, Jan. 3, 2005.

AACN Standards for Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments: A Journey to Excellence.  Aliso Viejo, CA:  American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, Jan. 2005.

Maxfield, D., and others.  Silence Kills: The Seven Crucial Conversations in Healthcare.  Aliso Viejo, CA:  American Association of Critical-Care Nurses and VitalSmarts, Jan. 2005.

Adverse Health Events in Minnesota Hospitals.  St. Paul, MN:  Minnesota Dept. of Health, Jan. 2005.

Mazor, K., and others.  Health plan members' views on forgiving medical errors.  The American Journal of Managed Care.  11(1):49-52, Jan. 2005.

Getting a handle on patient falls.  Materials Management in Health Care.  14(1):18-21, Jan. 2005.

Runy, L.  Patient safety & governance.  Hospitals & Health Networks.  79(1):32, Jan 2005.

Scan your patient to verigy surgical site.  OR Manager.  21(1):7, Jan. 2005.

The HIM Role in patient safety and quality of care.  Journal of AHIMA.  76(1):56A-56G, Jan. 2005.

Wild, D., and Bradley, E.  The gap between nurses and residents in a community hospital's error-reporting system.  Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.  31(1):13-20, Jan. 2005.

Piotrowski, M., and others.  Introducing the national patient safety goals department:  sharing programs of excellence from individual organizations.  Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.  31(1):43-46, Jan. 2005.

McCoy, L.  Look-alike, sound-alike drugs review:  include look-alike packaging as an additional safety check.  Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.  31(1):47-53, Jan. 2005.

Study finds consumers concerned about healthcare safety.  Healthcare Financial Management Association.  59(1):21-24, Jan. 2005.

Advances in patient safety technology.  HealthLeaders.  8(1):insert 19A-19B, Jan. 2005.

Fitzpatrick, J., and Koh, J.  If you build it (right), they will come:  the physician-friendly CPOE.  Health Management Technology.  26(1):52-53, Jan. 2005.

Patient safety survey.  Trustee.  58(1):8-9, Jan. 2005.

Leape, L.  Preventing Medical Errors.  In:  Mechanic, D., and others, editors.  Policy Challenges in Modern Health Care. New Brunswick, NJ:  Rutgers University Press, 2005.  pp. 162-176.

Newhouse, R., and Poe, S., editors.  Measuring patient safety.  Boston:  Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2005.  (WX 153 M484 2005).

Banja, J.  Medical Errors and Medical Narcissism.  Boston:  Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2005.  (WB 100 B217m 2005).

What Every Health Care Organization Should Know About:  Sentinel Events.   Oakbrook Terrace, IL:  Joint Commission Resouces, 2005.  (WX 185 W555 2005).

Hospital Patient Safety and Quality Monitoring:  A Resource for Governing Boards and Trustees.  Chicago:  Center for Healthcare Governance, 2005.  (WX 185 K96h 2005).

Gibbs, M.  Medication Reconciliation.  Marblehead, MA:  HCPro, Inc., 2005.  (QV 38 G443m 2005).

Patient Safety and Quality Reporting for Governance:  Data Reporting Guide for Hospital Staff.   Chicago:  Center for Healthcare Governance, 2005.  (WX 185 K96p 2005).

Rozovsky, F., and Woods, J., editors.  The Handbook of Patient Safety Compliance:  A Practical Guide for Health Care Organizations.  San Francisco:  Jossey-Bass, 2005.  (WB 100 H236 2005).

Abke, A.  Strategies for risks presented by obese patients in the ED.  Journal of Healthcare Risk Management.  25(4):33-35, 2005.

West, J.  Prescribers hold key to systemic reduction of medication error occurrences.  Journal of Healthcare Risk Management.  25(3):23-27, 2005.

Levick, D., Lukens, H., and Stillman, P. You've led the horse to water, now how do you get him to drink:  managing changes and increasing utilization of computerized provider order entry.  Journal of Healthcare Information Management.  19(1):70-75, Winter 2005.

Weisbaum, K., Hyland, S., and Bernstein, M.  Is consent required for publication of medical errors?  Healthcare Quarterly.  8(4):66-69, 2005.

Jardali, F., and Lagace, M.  Making hospital care safet and better:  the structure-process connection leading to adverse events.  Healthcare Quarterly.  8(2):40-48, 2005.

Leatt, P.  Longwoods Review.  Adversaria.  Healthcare Quarterly.  Insert:  3(1):2-8, 2005.

Gosbee, J., editor.  Using human factors engineering to improve patient safety.  Oakbtook Terrace, IL:  Joint Commission Resources, 2005.  (WX 185 U85 2005).

Morath, J., and Turnbull, J.  To Do No Harm:  Ensuring Patient Safety in Health Care Organizations.  San Francisco, CA:  Jossey-Bass, 2005.

 

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