New HIV infections declined among white gay and bisexual men but remained higher and relatively stable among Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men between 2010 and 2019, according to a report released yesterday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While gay and bisexual men account for two-thirds of new HIV infections each year, only 85% of HIV infections in men who have sex with men are diagnosed and 68% are virally suppressed, according to the latest data. Improving access to and use of HIV services for men who have sex with men, especially Black, Hispanic/Latino and younger men, “is essential to end the HIV epidemic in the United States,” the authors said.

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