The U.S. death rate decreased 8% between 2006 and 2016, to about 729 deaths per 100,000 residents, according to the latest annual report on the nation’s health by the National Center for Health Statistics, which includes a special feature on mortality. Death rates among males declined 18 percent for heart disease, 17 percent for stroke, 16 percent for cancer, 7 percent for chronic lower respiratory disease and 6 percent for diabetes, and increased 16 percent for unintentional injuries and 25 percent for Alzheimer’s disease. Death rates among females declined 22 percent for heart disease, 17 percent for both stroke and diabetes, and 13 percent for cancer, and increased 31 percent for Alzheimer’s disease and 19 percent for unintentional injuries. The death rate for drug overdoses increased 72 percent between 2006 and 2016, while the suicide death rate increased 23 percent. The teen birth rate fell by half to a record low 20.3 per 1,000 females, among other trends.

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