The three medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat opioid use disorder — methadone, buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone — are effective and save lives, but most people who could benefit from these treatments do not receive them, according to a report released today by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Barriers to their use include stigma; inadequate professional education and training for treatment providers and criminal justice personnel; distinct treatment systems and financing mechanisms for OUD; regulations such as waiver policies, patient limits, and restrictions on treatment settings; privacy regulations such as 42 CFR Part 2; and regulations that govern public and private insurance coverage, the study committee said. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and National Institute on Drug Abuse sponsored the study.
 

Related News Articles

Headline
The Health Resources and Services Administration yesterday awarded 120 organizations, including hospitals, $200,000 each to develop community partnerships and…
Headline
Laws that allow pharmacists to dispense the opioid antidote naloxone without a physician’s prescription are associated with a sharp reduction in fatal opioid-…
Headline
The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy seeks by 2022 to reduce drug overdose deaths and youth illicit drug use by 15 percent and opioid…
Perspective
Investing in our country’s health infrastructure is the right move to make.
Headline
The AHA yesterday announced support for the Opioid Workforce Act of 2019, bipartisan legislation to reduce the nation’s shortage of opioid treatment providers…
Headline
The National Academy of Medicine Action Collaborative on Countering the U.S. Opioid Epidemic, of which the AHA is a sponsor, held a two-day meeting this week…