Hospitals spend close to $360 million each year to manage drug shortages, according to a study released this week by Vizient Inc. The survey found that U.S. hospitals, on average, dedicate more than 8.6 million additional labor hours to handle the shortages, putting a strain on staff inside and outside of hospital pharmacies. All of the 365 responding facilities said they experienced shortages in the second half of 2018, with the most common deficiencies controlled substances, local anesthetics, antibiotics, electrolytes and emergency injectables.

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