The National Governors Association yesterday issued a report on state strategies to protect consumers from surprise medical bills. Eleven states have enacted surprise billing legislation since 2017, including six this year. “As increasing numbers of states implement new and innovative policies, there is a growing number of examples from which others can learn,” the report notes. “If Congress takes action, as proposed in NGA’s principles to Congress and the Administration, it will likely create a baseline protection for all consumers on which states can build. If this happens, it will be important for states to evaluate their own policies and federal policies over time to understand the impact on contracts, network access and cost of care to consumers as measured through premiums and other cost sharing.” The report summarizes roundtable discussions on the issue hosted by the NGA Center for Best Practices Health Division last fall in Washington, D.C., in which the AHA participated.

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