The HPV vaccine could prevent an estimated 92% of cancers caused by the human papillomavirus in the United States, according to a new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The authors attribute about 32,100 U.S. cancers annually to HPV-virus types targeted by the vaccine, most commonly oropharyngeal and cervical cancers. CDC recommends all children receive the HPV vaccine at age 11 or 12, or anytime through age 26 if not before. Just half of adolescents had received all recommended doses last year, according to the latest CDC data. “This new data shows 1 in 4 parents who received a medical recommendation for the HPV vaccine chose not to have their child vaccinated,” said CDC Director Robert Redfield, M.D. “The HPV vaccine is safe, and we encourage parents to get their pre-teens vaccinated and take the next step to prevent their children from developing HPV-related cancer later in life.”

Related News Articles

Headline
Acute-care hospitals reduced Clostridium difficile infections by 18%, catheter-associated urinary tract infections by 8% and central line-associated…
Headline
The Department of Health and Human Services Oct. 9 released the National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (CARB), 2020-2025, mapping the…
Headline
The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases yesterday announced $17 million in grants to establish the Centers…
Headline
The Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Secretary for Preparedness and Response and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have released…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has partnered with Medscape to offer free online training on its recommendations for vaccinating homeless people…