U.S. overdose deaths involving psychostimulants other than cocaine, largely methamphetamine, increased 180% among adults under age 65 between 2015 and 2019, to 15,489, according to a study by the National Institute on Drug Abuse published this week in JAMA Psychiatry. The number of people reporting methamphetamine use increased 43% over the period, suggesting that increases in methamphetamine use disorder, frequent use and use of other drugs at the same time may be contributing to the rise in deaths, the authors said.

“What makes these data even more devastating is that currently, there are no approved medications to treat methamphetamine use disorder,” said Emily Einstein, chief of NIDA’s Science Policy Branch and a co-author of the study. 
 

Related News Articles

Headline
April 30 is National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, an opportunity for the public to safely dispose of unwanted or expired tablets, capsules, patches and…
Headline
The AHA yesterday launched the newest poster in its People Matter, Words Matter series, a collaborative effort with the National Center for PTSD to help…
Headline
The Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division this week released guidance on how the Americans with Disabilities Act can protect individuals with opioid…
Headline
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration yesterday released a toolkit to help health care providers and others prepare for the July 16…
Headline
While intentional drug overdoses have declined overall in the United States, they have increased among young people, the elderly and Black women, according to…
Headline
The departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and the Treasury yesterday released their latest report to Congress on group health plan compliance…