The Food and Drug Administration does not currently authorize the monoclonal antibody bamlanivimab for emergency use to treat mild-to-moderate COVID-19 in the United States because it is not expected to neutralize the predominating BQ.1 and BQ.1.1. omicron subvariants, the Department of Health and Human Services announced yesterday. Eli Lilly and its distributors have paused commercial distribution of the treatment; and HHS’ Administration for Strategic Preparedness and Response has paused distribution under the Bebtelovimab Product Replacement Initiative. Health care providers should use other approved or authorized treatment options, HHS said.

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