The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week recommended health care personnel use “standard precautions” at all times in every health care setting to prevent potential transmission of the Zika virus, regardless of whether infection is suspected or confirmed. “Because of the potential for exposure to large volumes of body fluids during the labor and delivery process and the sometimes unpredictable and fast-paced nature of obstetrical care, the use of Standard Precautions in these settings is essential,” the agency said. Standard precautions include hand hygiene, use of personal protective equipment, respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette, safe injection practices, and safe handling of potentially contaminated equipment or surfaces in the patient environment. CDC said health care personnel “should assess their risk for exposure and select PPE appropriate for the situation,” and that all personnel on a team involved in the same procedures should use the same level of PPE. CDC urges ongoing education and training, noting that all personnel should be trained in the correct use and disposal of PPE and be able to don PPE quickly in urgent situations and remove it safely. Recent evidence suggests a possible association between maternal Zika virus infection and adverse fetal outcomes. Until more is known, CDC strongly advises pregnant women to consider postponing travel to Zika-affected areas. For more information, visit www.cdc.gov/zika and www.aha.org/zika.

Related News Articles

Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and the National Tuberculosis Controllers Association this week released updated recommendations for TB screening and testing…
Headline
The White House yesterday released a strategy to guide the federal government in protecting the nation from infectious disease threats by working with other…
Perspective
Investing in our country’s health infrastructure is the right move to make.
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday reported 695 cases of measles, the most since the virus was eliminated in the U.S. in 2000.
Insights and Analysis
East Alabama Medical Center in Opelika treated patients in early March for a tornado that claimed 23 lives and underscored the importance of natural disaster…
Headline
The Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response seeks stakeholder input through April 26 on a…