Appropriate use of antibiotics to prevent surgical site infections varies substantially across children’s hospitals, according to a study reported today in JAMA Pediatrics. Based on a review of administrative data from 31 freestanding children’s hospitals between 2010 and 2013, appropriate use of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis varied by hospital from 47.3% to 84.4%. When antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated for a procedure based on guidelines or consensus statements, the median rate of appropriate use was 93.8%; when antibiotic prophylaxis was not recommended, the median rate of appropriate use was 52%. The authors said the lack of pediatric-specific guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis use may be the most likely reason for the variation. They cited an urgent need for additional research to document the procedure-specific risk of surgical site infection among pediatric patients and establish strategies to improve antibiotic prophylaxis use for children.

Related News Articles

Headline
The World Health Organization today declared the Ebola virus disease outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo a public health emergency of…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare…
Headline
CMS anticipates releasing later this summer the feedback it received on potential methodology changes to the overall hospital quality star ratings, the agency…
Headline
The Health Resources and Services Administration yesterday recognized 10 states whose critical access hospitals had the highest quality reporting rates and…
Headline
Two investigational Ebola treatments being used in the ongoing outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are effective in laboratory studies.
Headline
HHS will bring together key health care stakeholders and government leaders to discuss how current quality programs can deliver better outcomes for patients.