The Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program did not result in meaningful improvements in clinical process or patient experience measures during its first four years, because performance improved similarly for hospitals not exposed to the program, according to a study reported last week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The program was associated with reduced mortality among patients admitted for pneumonia, but not among patients admitted for heart attack or heart failure. Nancy Foster, AHA vice president for quality and patient safety policy, said the findings “should not be surprising for two important reasons. First, the measures used in the VBP program, especially those used in the first few years, had been publicly reported for several years. Many of the improvements that could be achieved had already occurred. Second, hospitals view the inclusion of a measure in the Hospital VBP program as a strong signal from Medicare that high performance on the measure is important. Thus, hospitals seek to achieve high levels of performance on the chosen measures regardless of whether they are subject to a payment penalty or not.”

Related News Articles

Perspective
Two weeks ago, I wrote about the
Headline
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit reversed the voiding of a rule that included Medicare and private insurance payments when…
Headline
The AHA today voiced support for the Improving Seniors’ Timely Access to Care Act (H.R. 3107), bipartisan legislation that would establish requirements for the…
Headline
Medicare will cover nationally Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-cell therapies approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat certain cancers, as well as off…
Headline
Offering a government insurance program reimbursing at Medicare rates as a public option on the health insurance exchanges could place as many as 55% of rural…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services will discontinue the Medicare Advantage Qualifying Payment Arrangement Incentive Demonstration due