The latest report from a group financed and backed by the pharmaceutical industry “continues to misrepresent” the 340B Drug Pricing Program and its “successful 25-year history of helping hospitals stretch scarce financial resources to expand and improve access to lifesaving prescription drugs and comprehensive health services,” AHA Executive Vice President Tom Nickels writes today in an AHA Stat blog post. Nickels says the report “attempts to mislead the debate by comparing changes in the ‘charity care’ provided by a small sample size of 160 disproportionate share hospitals (out of 2,448 hospitals) that participate in the 340B program,” and he highlights the many benefits 340B hospitals provide to the patients and communities they serve. "We hope policymakers won’t be diverted by this self-serving report from the important job of finding solutions to bring down the exorbitant cost of many prescription drugs that is threatening the availability of life-saving medications for millions of Americans,” Nickels writes.

Related News Articles

Headline
The National Health Law Program and other groups yesterday filed a class action lawsuit against the Department of Health and Human Services for approving a…
Headline
The three medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat opioid use disorder — methadone, buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone —…
Headline
Hospitals in states that impose Medicaid work requirements could see reduced Medicaid revenues and operating margins and increased uncompensated care costs,…
Headline
About 34 percent of uninsured U.S. adults did not take their medication as prescribed in 2017 in order to reduce their prescription drug costs, according to a…
Headline
The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission Friday released its March report to Congress.
Headline
In a study of Blue Cross and Blue Shield enrollees reported last week in the New England Journal of Medicine, initial opioid prescriptions declined 54 percent…