The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services this week approved a waiver allowing Utah to expand Medicaid services to up to 6,000 low-income adults without children. Adults with incomes up to 5% percent of the federal poverty line who are chronically homeless or suffer from substance use issues would gain coverage, and the state will begin enrolling individuals newly eligible for Medicaid immediately. CMS also approved a Section 1115 waiver for Utah for a demonstration project to provide residential substance abuse treatment services to Medicaid recipients. The approval was part of a new CMS policy that allows states to design demonstration projects that increase access to treatment for opioid use disorders and other SUDs. “Utah’s hospitals have worked with Rep. Dunnigan and Gov. Herbert’s administration on this waiver request from the beginning,” said Greg Bell, president and CEO of the Utah Hospital Association. “The waiver is one step in finding uniquely Utah solutions to increase health care coverage in our state. We look forward to working with our members, our public health partners and the Utah state legislature to continue to innovate and identify coverage solutions that work for our communities.”

Related News Articles

Headline
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration will launch a three-part virtual learning series on recovery supports for people considering or…
Perspective
Improving rural health is an AHA priority because we truly cannot advance health in America without keeping our rural communities strong.
Headline
The House of Representatives last night voted 419-6 to pass legislation (H.R. 748) that would repeal the 40% excise tax on high-value employer-sponsored health…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare…
Headline
Drug overdose deaths declined 5.1% in 2018 to about 68,000, according to preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Headline
The House Energy and Commerce Committee today approved legislation to address surprise medical bills and Medicaid disproportionate share hospital cuts.