More than 1 million Americans died from drug overdoses, alcohol and suicides between 2006 and 2015, and another 1.6 million could die over the next decade if the trend continues, according to a report released today by Trust for America’s Health and Well Being Trust. “Life expectancy in the country decreased last year for the first time in two decades – and these three public health crises have been major contributing factors to this shift,” the authors note. The report calls for a national “resilience” strategy focused on prevention, early identification of issues and effective treatment. “The good news is: we know a lot about what works and can make a difference," said Benjamin Miller, chief policy officer for Well Being Trust. For more information, including an interactive tool highlighting state-level trends and projections, visit http://tfah.org/reports/paininthenation.

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