House and Senate Republican conferees Friday released the conference report for legislation to overhaul the nation's tax code, which would maintain tax-exemption for private-activity bonds, as advocated by the AHA. “We are also pleased that the conference agreement’s definition of taxable income for purposes of calculating interest expense deductions follows the House bill and will be preserved in the near term,” said AHA President and CEO Rick Pollack. “This will facilitate assistance for certain hospitals to ensure access to care. Together with the preservation of medical expense deductions for patients with high medical costs – utilized by nearly 10 million Americans annually – we are encouraged by the inclusion of these important provisions in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. However, we are concerned about the inclusion of the individual mandate repeal and the consequences that this would pose to our patients. It is unfortunate that the important task of overhauling the tax code will erode health coverage for many.” The House could vote on the conference report as early as tomorrow, with a Senate vote to follow shortly afterward.

Related News Articles

Headline
The Department of Health and Human Services this week awarded $487 million in fiscal year 2019 grants to help states and territories increase access to…
Headline
The National Health Law Program and other groups yesterday filed a class action lawsuit against the Department of Health and Human Services for approving a…
Headline
The three medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat opioid use disorder — methadone, buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone —…
Headline
Hospitals in states that impose Medicaid work requirements could see reduced Medicaid revenues and operating margins and increased uncompensated care costs,…
Headline
About 34 percent of uninsured U.S. adults did not take their medication as prescribed in 2017 in order to reduce their prescription drug costs, according to a…
Headline
In a study of Blue Cross and Blue Shield enrollees reported last week in the New England Journal of Medicine, initial opioid prescriptions declined 54 percent…