America’s Health Insurance Plans today released findings from a study assessing health insurance claims from 2009 to 2013 on six recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain. According to AHIP, the vast majority of opioid prescriptions for chronic pain were for immediate-release opioids, consistent with CDC recommendations, but certain other measures could be improved. For example, about one-quarter of opioid prescriptions were above the CDC-recommended morphine milligram equivalent dosage, the organization said. The study methodology has been shared with insurance providers nationwide, who may apply it to measure their own opioid prevention and management efforts.

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