America’s Health Insurance Plans today released findings from a study assessing health insurance claims from 2009 to 2013 on six recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain. According to AHIP, the vast majority of opioid prescriptions for chronic pain were for immediate-release opioids, consistent with CDC recommendations, but certain other measures could be improved. For example, about one-quarter of opioid prescriptions were above the CDC-recommended morphine milligram equivalent dosage, the organization said. The study methodology has been shared with insurance providers nationwide, who may apply it to measure their own opioid prevention and management efforts.

Related News Articles

Perspective
As a politically practical matter, we need to focus on finding consensus to improve the system we have rather than subject the nation to yet another polarizing…
Headline
The departments of the Treasury, Labor, and Health and Human Services yesterday asked for public input on how they might help group health plans and issuers…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services today released an updated tool for viewing and comparing opioid prescribing rates over time and across regions.
Headline
The Department of Veterans Affairs today proposed the criteria for determining when covered veterans may elect to receive necessary hospital, medic
Headline
The National Academy of Medicine Action Collaborative on Countering the U.S. Opioid Epidemic last week held a webinar on the work it will undertake over the…
Headline
National health expenditures are projected to grow an average 5.5 percent annually during 2018-2027, outpacing average projected growth in gross domestic…