U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, M.D., today issued a public health advisory urging Americans who misuse opioids, have an opioid use disorder or recent overdose, or know someone who does, to carry and know how to use naloxone – a drug that can be delivered via nasal mist or injection to temporarily suspend the effects of an overdose until emergency responders arrive. “Each day we lose 115 Americans to an opioid overdose – that’s one person every 12.5 minutes,” Adams said. “It is time to make sure more people have access to this lifesaving medication, because 77% of opioid overdose deaths occur outside of a medical setting and more than half occur at home.” Approved by the Food and Drug Administration, naloxone is covered by most health plans and may be available to the uninsured at low or no cost through local public health programs or retailer and manufacturer discounts, Adams said. “To manage opioid addiction and prevent future overdoses, increased naloxone availability must occur in conjunction with expanded access to evidence-based treatment for opioid use disorder,” he said. For more information on preventing opioid overdoses, visit www.surgeongeneral.gov/priorities/opioid-overdose-prevention.

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