Current state proposals to require certain Medicaid beneficiaries to participate in work, training or other “community engagement” activity to remain eligible for coverage could affect more than 1.7 million enrollees and nearly $8 billion in program expenditures, according to an analysis released last week by PwC’s Health Research Institute. The report examines the potential impact of community engagement proposals in 10 states: Arizona, Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Utah and Wisconsin. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently approved Section 1115 demonstration waivers for Kentucky, Indiana and Arkansas that include such requirements.

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