Sixteen U.S. senators today urged the Department of Health and Human Services to take immediate action to reduce the price of naloxone – a drug that can be delivered via nasal mist or injection to temporarily suspend the effects of an overdose until emergency responders arrive. “No police officer, no firefighter, no public health provider, and no person should be unable to save a life because of the high price,” the senators wrote to HHS Secretary Alex Azar. “By bringing down the cost, we can get this life-saving drug in the hands of more people as called for by the Surgeon General. Doing so will save countless lives.” Earlier this month, U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, M.D., issued a public health advisory urging Americans who misuse opioids, have an opioid use disorder or recent overdose, or know someone who does, to carry and know how to use naloxone.

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