The number of U.S. retail opioid prescriptions fell by 10.2% in 2017, including a 16.1% decline in high-dose prescriptions, according to a report released today by the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines high-dose prescriptions as 90 morphine milligram equivalents or more per day. Total MME volume fell by 12%, or 23.3 billion, the largest annual drop in more than 25 years, according to the report. New opioid therapy starts fell 7.8%, while treatment starts for medication-assisted therapies nearly doubled to 82,000 prescriptions per month. The report also includes many other findings about drug spending, including that patients spent $57.8 billion in 2017 in out-of-pocket costs for medicines, including copays, coinsurance, payments during deductible phases of their insurance, or due to lack of insurance coverage.

Related News Articles

Headline
The House Energy and Commerce Committee today approved legislation to address surprise medical bills and Medicaid disproportionate share hospital cuts.
Headline
Under a new Centers for Medicare…
Headline
The Trump administration today withdrew a proposed rule that would eliminate the rebate safe harbor for pharmacy benefit managers under the federal anti-…
Headline
A federal judge yesterday struck down a Centers for Medicare…
Headline
Six health care organizations in rural North Carolina communities will share $1.2 million in federal grant funds to strengthen and expand their response to…
Headline
Drug makers this week increased list prices for at least 104 different drugs, dosages or package sizes, with the average price increase 13.1%, according to an…