The number of U.S. retail opioid prescriptions fell by 10.2% in 2017, including a 16.1% decline in high-dose prescriptions, according to a report released today by the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines high-dose prescriptions as 90 morphine milligram equivalents or more per day. Total MME volume fell by 12%, or 23.3 billion, the largest annual drop in more than 25 years, according to the report. New opioid therapy starts fell 7.8%, while treatment starts for medication-assisted therapies nearly doubled to 82,000 prescriptions per month. The report also includes many other findings about drug spending, including that patients spent $57.8 billion in 2017 in out-of-pocket costs for medicines, including copays, coinsurance, payments during deductible phases of their insurance, or due to lack of insurance coverage.

Related News Articles

Headline
he House of Representatives last night voted 234-183 to pass legislation (H.R. 987) that combines several AHA-supported bills to help lower prescription drug…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare…
Blog
Drug companies are at it again. And their latest effort to divert the focus from the huge profits they pocket as drug prices rise is just as disingenuous as…
Headline
The largest U.S. pharmaceutical and biotech companies spend just 22 cents out of every dollar on research and development, according to an analysis released…
Headline
The Health Resources and Services Administration yesterday awarded 120 organizations, including hospitals, $200,000 each to develop community partnerships and…
Headline
The House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health today held a hearing on lowering prescription drugs prices, which focused on the drug supply chain.