Illnesses from mosquito, tick and flea bites more than tripled in the United States between 2004 and 2016 to more than 96,000 a year, according to a report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 642,000 cases were reported over the period. “Zika, West Nile, Lyme, and chikungunya – a growing list of diseases caused by the bite of an infected mosquito, tick, or flea – have confronted the U.S. in recent years, making a lot of people sick. And we don’t know what will threaten Americans next,” said CDC Director Robert R. Redfield, M.D. “Our nation’s first lines of defense are state and local health departments and vector-control organizations, and we must continue to enhance our investment in their ability to fight against these diseases.”

Related News Articles

Headline
The Federal Emergency Management Agency yesterday released guidance to help emergency managers plan for disaster response and recovery while adhering to…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention today joined the global public health community in marking the end of the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services today released interpretive guidance for emergency preparedness provisions in its 2019 final rule …
Headline
The Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response last week released "The Storm After the Storm:…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has selected 184 ambulance providers and suppliers in 36 states to participate in the Services Emergency…
Headline
Trust for America’s Health today released its latest annual report assessing states on 10 public health readiness indicators ranging from whether they have a…