Illnesses from mosquito, tick and flea bites more than tripled in the United States between 2004 and 2016 to more than 96,000 a year, according to a report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 642,000 cases were reported over the period. “Zika, West Nile, Lyme, and chikungunya – a growing list of diseases caused by the bite of an infected mosquito, tick, or flea – have confronted the U.S. in recent years, making a lot of people sick. And we don’t know what will threaten Americans next,” said CDC Director Robert R. Redfield, M.D. “Our nation’s first lines of defense are state and local health departments and vector-control organizations, and we must continue to enhance our investment in their ability to fight against these diseases.”

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