Enrollment in the individual health insurance market fell by 12% between first-quarter 2017 and first-quarter 2018 to 14.4 million people, according to a new analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation. All of the decline was in the off-exchange market, where enrollees are not eligible for federal premium subsidies and have had to pay the full cost of recent premium increases, the authors said. Enrollment in exchange plans increased by 3% to 10.6 million people, including 9.2 million receiving federal premium subsidies. The analysis is based on federal enrollment data and administrative data that insurers report to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners.

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