Effective Jan. 1, The Joint Commission will require accredited hospitals with at least 300 live births per year to report the percentage of infants with unexpected newborn complications among full-term newborns with no pre-existing conditions, the organization announced yesterday. All hospitals seeking perinatal care certification also will be required to report on the measure. A Joint Commission working group also is considering whether to establish possible requirements for hospitals to standardize management of patients with hemorrhage or hypertension, the organization said.

Related News Articles

Headline
U.S. birth rates declined for the fourth consecutive year with only 3.78 million babies born in 2018, the fewest in over three decades, according to a report…
Headline
The House Ways and Means Committee today held a hearing examining the impact of racial disparities and social determinants of health on maternal mortality.
Headline
The Food and Drug Administration yesterday published draft guidance to promote clinical studies to increase drug safety information for pregnant and nursing…
Insights and Analysis
Now in its third year, the March for Moms is an annual march in Washington, D.C., to urge policymakers to dedicate more funding and pass legislation to help…
Headline
An estimated 31 percent of pregnancy-related deaths occur during pregnancy, 36 percent during delivery or the week after, and 33 percent one week to one year…
Headline
The Federal Trade Commission will hold a public workshop June 18 in Washington, D.C., to assess the impact of certificates of public advantage on health care…