The Health Resources and Services Administration yesterday awarded $2 million to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists to reduce preventable maternal deaths and complications from childbirth through the Alliance for Innovation on Maternal Health (AIM). The funding will enable AIM to engage more states, hospitals and other stakeholders in the four-year-old partnership to implement maternal safety bundles, practices proven to improve patient outcomes when collectively and reliably implemented in the delivery setting. Currently, 18 states and 985 hospitals participate in the initiative, in which state health departments, hospitals, provider groups and others collaborate to implement the practices and analyze outcomes for continuous improvement. “We were very concerned about how we were going to keep up with demand but with this additional funding we will now be able to expand the number of AIM states from 18 to 35,” said Barbara Levy, M.D., ACOG vice president of health policy. AHA is a partner in AIM.
 

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