Naloxone administration by emergency medical service providers increased 75% between 2012 and 2016, mirroring the trend in fatal opioid overdoses over the period, according to an analysis released yesterday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Young adults comprised a growing share of naloxone recipients and opioid-related deaths over the period, the study found. Almost one in four recipients was aged 25-34 in 2016, up from 17% in 2012.

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