In children, antibiotics are the leading cause of emergency department visits for adverse drug events, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study published yesterday in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. The study estimates that 70,000 children 19 years or younger visited the ED for antibiotic-related adverse drug events each year from 2011–2015. Antibiotics save lives and are critical tools for treating infections, but they can lead to adverse drug events. AHA has compiled a number of resources on antibiotic stewardship, including a toolkit developed in collaboration with CDC and others. In addition, see the CDC factsheet about antibiotic use.

Related News Articles

Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday issued revised guidance for pediatric clinicians on caring for newborns with confirmed or suspected…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday issued a health advisory warning of COVID-19-associated multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children…
Headline
A new AHA resource shares ways hospitals and health systems are caring for mothers and babies during the COVID-19 crisis. The resource examines labor and…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention today reported a notable drop in routine childhood vaccines ordered and administered through the federal…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday released guidance for health care providers who care for breastfeeding women and infants who receive…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services recently announced a six-month delay in implementation of its Innovation Center Maternal Opioid Misuse (MOM)…