Clinicians assessing patients affected by Hurricane Florence should be vigilant in looking for community and health care-associated infections, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advised yesterday. Infectious disease outbreaks of diarrheal and respiratory illnesses can occur when access to safe water and sewage systems are disrupted, personal hygiene is difficult to maintain, and people are living in crowded conditions such as shelters, the advisory notes. The agency strongly encourages providers to report suspected cases of leptospirosis, hepatitis A and vibriosis to local health authorities, and confirmed cases to the state or territorial health department to facilitate investigation and mitigate the risk of local transmission.

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