Medicare Part B suppliers may deliver the initial immunosuppressive drugs prescribed to a beneficiary after a transplant procedure to an address other than their home to ensure timely access to the medications at discharge, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced last week in updated guidance. “In certain cases, a beneficiary who has received a transplant does not return home immediately after discharge,” the guidance states. “In order to ensure timely beneficiary access to prescribed immunosuppressive medications at the time of discharge, suppliers may deliver the initial prescriptions of a beneficiary’s immunosuppressive drugs to an alternate address, such as the transplant facility or alternative location where the beneficiary is temporarily staying, for example, temporary housing, instead of delivering the drugs to the patient’s home address.” AHA advocated for the policy change.

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