A treatment protocol to prevent Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections after hospital discharge in patients known to carry the bacteria on their body reduced MRSA infections by 30 percent more than education alone, according to a study funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and reported this month in the New England Journal of Medicine. The patients were treated with a combination of an over-the-counter antiseptic for bathing or showering, plus prescription antiseptic mouthwash and antibiotic nasal ointment. Participants who followed the treatment completely had a 44 percent reduction in MRSA infections and 40 percent reduction in all infections. "The results of this study show that focused attention on removing MRSA can reduce infections and make a measurable difference in the lives of patients,” said AHRQ Director Gopal Khanna.  
 

Related News Articles

Headline
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration May 23 authorized marketing of a diagnostic test for detecting Zika virus antibodies in human blood.
Headline
The Joint Commission yesterday recommended that health care organizations review cleaning and disinfection instructions for tonometers and other ophthalmology…
Headline
A federal court in Texas yesterday ordered Pharm D Solutions to stop producing or distributing compounded drugs intended to be sterile until the company…
Blog
America’s hospitals and health systems are dedicated to doing everything possible for patients, particularly when they need emergency care and as a place for…
Headline
Hospitals, health systems and other health care organizations can sign up this week to host an intern for this year's Institute for Diversity and Health Equity…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and the National Tuberculosis Controllers Association this week released updated recommendations for TB screening and testing…