A treatment protocol to prevent Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections after hospital discharge in patients known to carry the bacteria on their body reduced MRSA infections by 30 percent more than education alone, according to a study funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and reported this month in the New England Journal of Medicine. The patients were treated with a combination of an over-the-counter antiseptic for bathing or showering, plus prescription antiseptic mouthwash and antibiotic nasal ointment. Participants who followed the treatment completely had a 44 percent reduction in MRSA infections and 40 percent reduction in all infections. "The results of this study show that focused attention on removing MRSA can reduce infections and make a measurable difference in the lives of patients,” said AHRQ Director Gopal Khanna.  
 

Related News Articles

Headline
About 80 percent of new HIV infections in the U.S. in 2016 were transmitted from the nearly 40 percent of people with HIV who either did not know they had HIV…
Headline
Historic flooding in parts of the Midwest caused a number of Nebraska hospitals to be inaccessible by ground transportation, the Nebraska Hospital Association…
Headline
The Senate Appropriations Committee’s Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies today held a
Insights and Analysis
In this AHA Stat Blog, Institute for Diversity and Health Equity President and CEO Duane Reynolds shares some takeaways from the recent ACHE conference and…
Insights and Analysis
This week, as part of the South by Southwest (SXSW) festival’s Interactive Health and MedTech track, the American Hospital Association and hospital leaders…
Headline
A federal court has ordered a Texas-based company to stop producing compounded drug products intended to be sterile until the company complies with the Federal…