The AHA commented today on the Stopping the Outrageous Practice of Surprise Medical Bills Act (S. 1531), legislation developed by the Senate Bipartisan Working Group to address surprise medical bills. “We agree with the Working Group that it is essential to prohibit balance billing in certain scenarios and to limit the patient’s obligation to one’s in-network cost-sharing responsibilities,” AHA wrote. “Once the patient is protected, hospitals and health systems should be permitted to work with health plans to determine appropriate reimbursement. We believe there could be an important role for an independent dispute resolution process, such as the one included in the legislation with some modifications, for physician claims only, much how some states have approached surprise billing protections, including New York.”
 

Related News Articles

Perspective
Benjamin Franklin once said, “Energy and persistence conquer all things.” We’ve been persistent and — after more than a year of talking to representatives and…
Headline
The House Ways and Means Committee today favorably reported out, as amended, the Consumer Protections Against Surprise Medical Bills Act (H.R. 5826), AHA-…
Headline
The House Education and Labor Committee today voted 32-13 to report out an amended version of the Ban Surprise Billing Act (H.R. 5800), legislation to address…
Headline
The AHA today expressed support for the Consumer Protections Against Surprise Medical Bills Act of 2020, bipartisan legislation released last week by leaders…
Headline
House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., and Ranking Member Kevin Brady, R-Texas, this morning released legislative text of the Consumer…
Headline
Leaders of the House Energy and Commerce and Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committees yesterday asked six health insurers and two physician…