Two investigational Ebola treatments being used in the ongoing outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are effective in laboratory studies, according to new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention research. The treatments — the antiviral remdesivir and antibodies in the ZMapp treatment — blocked growth of the virus strain causing the outbreak in human cells in the laboratory. The research suggests these treatments hold promise for allowing patients to recover from the deadly illness. The research was published yesterday in Lancet Infectious Diseases. The study also shows that the lab test most often used in the DRC and neighboring countries to diagnose Ebola — which was developed during the 2014-2016 West Africa outbreak for use against a different strain of Ebola virus — appears to be accurate for the outbreak strain now circulating in DRC.

Related News Articles

Headline
The Food and Drug Administration yesterday approved the first FDA-approved vaccine to prevent Ebola in adults with Zaire ebolavirus, which killed more…
Headline
A total of 2,291 patients have been hospitalized for vaping-associated lung injuries in the states, Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands, and 48 people have…
Headline
Achieving the U.S. goal of reducing new HIV infections by 90% over 10 years will require accelerated efforts to diagnose, treat and prevent HIV, according to a…
Headline
A new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study published today in JAMA Pediatrics reveals that nearly one in five adolescents aged 12-18 years,…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention today released updated guidance to help health care providers diagnose and treat patients with vaping-…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday updated the number of people with confirmed or probable lung injuries associated with electronic…