The Food and Drug Administration today recommended medical device manufacturers, health care providers and patients take certain actions to reduce the risk that a remote attacker could exploit a set of cybersecurity vulnerabilities to control a medical device or prevent it from functioning. The agency to date has not received any adverse event reports associated with the vulnerabilities, announced in a July advisory from the Department of Homeland Security. The vulnerabilities exist in IPnet, a third-party software component that supports network communications between computers. The software is part of several operating systems and may be used in a wide range of medical and industrial devices.
 

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