The AHA today urged the Drug Enforcement Administration to explicitly consider drug shortages when setting and adjusting aggregate production quotas, citing concern that the agency’s proposal to reduce 2020 production quotas for five opioid controlled substances would exacerbate shortages of injectable opioid medications. “Beyond the negative impact on patient care, inadequate supplies of these drugs also creates burdensome and potentially dangerous workarounds for health care staff who must use alternative, often suboptimal products,” AHA wrote. Among other actions, AHA continued to recommend that DEA routinely consult with the Food and Drug Administration when establishing and adjusting quotas. “Obtaining [national drug] shortage data from the FDA will help to ensure that the DEA’s annual production quotas are set to provide adequate supplies for the United States’ legitimate needs,” the association said.

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