Kaiser Permanente Chairman and CEO Bernard Tyson, a renowned health care leader and champion for high-quality, affordable health care, died in his sleep Nov. 10. He was 60. 
 
Tyson’s career at Kaiser Permanente spanned more than 30 years, serving in roles from hospital administrator and division president to chief operating officer. Tyson became CEO of Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc. and Hospitals — commonly known as Kaiser Permanente — in 2013. He was named chairman of the board of directors in 2014.
 
Under Tyson’s leadership, Kaiser Permanente was recognized for delivering high-quality and affordable health care and improving the health of its members and the 68 million residents in its communities. When Tyson became CEO in 2013, Kaiser Permanente had 9.1 million members, employed a workforce of 174,000, included 17,000 physicians, and generated $53 billion in annual revenue. Today, the organization provides care and coverage to 12.3 million members, has a workforce of 218,000 employees, includes 23,000 physicians, and annual revenue of more than $82.8 billion.
 
Tyson has spearheaded many initiatives to improve community health and equity. Earlier this year, Kaiser Permanente announced several community partnerships to improve access to stable housing for vulnerable populations in the Bay Area and other communities it serves, including investing in a 41-unit housing complex near its national headquarters, a $100 million loan fund for affordable housing, and efforts to end homelessness for more than 500 older residents with chronic health conditions. The health system also has invested millions in research to prevent gun injuries and death.
 
“The field has lost a giant in health care,” said AHA President and CEO Rick Pollack. “Bernard Tyson was a champion for creating a more integrated and coordinated delivery system, and expanding coverage and access. He was deeply passionate about the need to focus on wellness and prevention and was a tireless advocate for equitable care. Whether it was addressing food insecurity or homelessness, he was a thoughtful voice on building a better future for all. The AHA extends our condolences to his wife, sons and the Kaiser Permanente family at this time.” 
 
Tyson is survived by his wife, Denise Bradley-Tyson, and three sons; Bernard J. Tyson Jr., Alexander and Charles. 

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