Only half of adults in their early 50s received a recommended screening test for colorectal cancer in 2018, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends a colonoscopy or other colorectal cancer screening test for adults aged 50-75 who are at average risk, such as those who do not have a personal or family history of colorectal cancer or polyps. In 2018, screening in the recommended age group increased with age. It was lowest among those lacking health insurance or a regular care provider, and highest among those whose annual household income was $75,000 or more. Screening prevalence by state was highest in Massachusetts (76.5%) and lowest in Wyoming (57.8%). Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States.

Related News Articles

Headline
More than 1 million prescriptions for the COVID-19 antiviral pills Lagevrio and Paxlovid were dispensed between late December 2021 and May 2022, but dispensing…
Perspective
Hospitals and health systems have always been the trusted source of care that people turn to in times of sickness, injury or emergency. But beyond…
Blog
June is LGBTQ+ Pride Month. This tradition started back in 1969 with the Stonewall Riots – a series of demonstrations that were brought on by the continued…
Headline
President Biden yesterday directed the Health and Human Services Secretary to develop and release sample policies for states “to safeguard and expand access to…
Chairperson's File
American author and disability rights advocate Helen Keller said, “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” Coming together to exchange ideas,…
Headline
The Consumer Price Index has climbed 8.6% over the past 12 months before seasonal adjustment, the fastest increase in over 40 years, the Bureau of Labor…