Only half of adults in their early 50s received a recommended screening test for colorectal cancer in 2018, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends a colonoscopy or other colorectal cancer screening test for adults aged 50-75 who are at average risk, such as those who do not have a personal or family history of colorectal cancer or polyps. In 2018, screening in the recommended age group increased with age. It was lowest among those lacking health insurance or a regular care provider, and highest among those whose annual household income was $75,000 or more. Screening prevalence by state was highest in Massachusetts (76.5%) and lowest in Wyoming (57.8%). Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States.

Related News Articles

Headline
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Mandy Cohen, M.D., April 16 shared with attendees of AHA’s 2024 Annual Membership Meeting how her team is…
Headline
The White House April 16 released a strategy to guide the federal government in protecting the nation from infectious disease threats by working with other…
Blog
Since 2018, Black Maternal Health Week has been a national observance from April 11–17. This annual observance was created by the Black Mamas Matter Alliance…
Headline
Women with health-related social needs such as food insecurity, housing instability and lack of transportation were less likely to report receiving a mammogram…
Headline
For future public health emergencies, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services should improve how it sets Medicare rates for clinical diagnostic…
Headline
The Office of Management and Budget March 28 released its final updated standards for Federal agencies on maintaining, collecting and presenting data on race…