The AHA today urged the Internal Revenue Services to remove the treatment of health care sharing ministries from a proposed rule issued by the agency in June.

The IRS is proposing through this rule to define payments toward health care ministry memberships as medical insurance, for the purpose of making such payments tax deductible under Section 213 of the Internal Revenue Code.

In a letter to IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig, AHA expressed concern with this policy as “health care sharing ministries are not medical insurance.

These plans operate outside of state and federal insurance regulations and do not have to guarantee coverage for pre-existing conditions or any other services — a fact that regularly confuses consumers and leaves them vulnerable to significant medical bills.”

Related News Articles

Headline
An estimated 29.6 million (9.2%) U.S. residents lacked health coverage when surveyed in 2019, up from 28.6 million (8.9%) in 2018, according to American…
Headline
The Department of Treasury’s Internal Revenue Service recently issued guidance for implementing the White House’s Aug. 8 executive order on payroll taxes,…
Headline
The AHA today urged the Office of Management and Budget to expedite its review and release of final regulations on physician self-referral and the Anti-…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and Department of the Treasury today approved a Section 1332 waiver for New Hampshire to implement a five-year…
Headline
The Federal Reserve July 30 at 2 p.m. ET will host a webinar for nonprofit organizations on its new lending facilities under the Main Street Lending Program…
Perspective
Expanding access to telehealth services to provide much more patient-centered, convenient care. Creating additional health care workforce capacity and avoiding…