A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study released today shows an increase between 2018 and 2019 in rates of suspected nonfatal drug overdoses involving opioids, cocaine and amphetamines, and of polydrug overdoses co-involving opioids and amphetamines that were treated in the emergency department.

The study, using data from EDs in 29 states, indicates that overdose rates increased 9.7% for opioids, 11% for cocaine and 18.3% for amphetamines, while the rate of benzodiazepine-involved overdoses decreased 3%.The authors note the importance of expanding syndromic surveillance, increasing naloxone provisions and identifying specific risk factors for those using these drugs.

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