A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study revealed that adults with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results were approximately twice as likely to have reported dining at restaurants within 14 days of developing symptoms compared with those whose test results were negative.

Visits to on-site eating and drinking establishments was clear delineating factor between patients with positive test results and those without.

“Reports of exposures in restaurants have been linked to air circulation,” the authors wrote. “Direction, ventilation, and intensity of airflow might affect virus transmission, even if social distancing measures and mask use are implemented according to current guidance.”

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