A new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study is revealing the extent to which adults are bypassing medical care because of their COVID-19-related concerns. According the authors, 41% of U.S. adults delayed or avoided medical care as of June 30. This includes urgent or emergency care (12%) and routine care (32%).

The trend was more prevalent among unpaid caregivers for adults, individuals with underlying medical conditions, Black adults, Hispanic adults, young adults, and individual with disabilities.

AHA has warned that such deferrals are putting lives at risk unnecessarily during the COVID-19 public health emergency and urges patients to seek necessary care, noting that many hospitals have posted information on their websites about how patients are protected from COVID-19 when they seek care.

Related News Articles

Headline
The Trump administration yesterday began distributing 150 million rapid point-of-care tests for the COVID-19 virus that it purchased in August, which will go…
Headline
House Democrats last night unveiled a new version of the Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions (HEROES) Act – a $2.2 trillion COVID-19…
Headline
The AHA and Aligning for Health Sept. 24 hosted a webinar detailing how hospitals and health systems are working to better identify and address health, social…
Headline
Weekly COVID-19 cases among college-aged youth increased 55% nationally between Aug. 2 and Sept. 5, according to a report released today by the Centers for…
Headline
AHA’s The Value Initiative is providing new resources to support hospitals’ and health systems’ efforts to adopt team-based care for patients with an acute or…
Headline
A Lancet study published Sept. 25 indicates that few in the U.S. adult population formed antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, at least during the virus’ first wave…