The Department of Health and Human Services today released new practice guidelines for administering buprenorphine, which exempt from certain training and certification requirements eligible physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, certified registered nurse anesthetists and certified nurse midwives who wish to treat up to 30 patients at any time. The clinicians must be licensed under state law and possess a federal waiver to practice this form of medication-assisted treatment and a valid Drug Enforcement Administration registration. Some states also require a DEA-registered physician to supervise or collaborate with the practitioner. Eligible clinicians who wish to treat more patients may seek a waiver under the established protocols

“These new guidelines are an important step forward in reducing barriers to treatment and will ultimately help more people find recovery,” said Tom Coderre, acting assistant secretary for mental health and substance use at HHS. 
 

Related News Articles

Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has selected 61 applicants for the Value in Opioid Use Disorder Treatment Demonstration, a four-year…
Headline
Public health departments that receive certain federal grants to prevent opioid overdoses can now use those funds to purchase fentanyl test strips, the Centers…
Headline
Physicians registered with the Drug Enforcement Administration will no longer need to meet the X-waiver requirement to prescribe treatments such as…
Blog
The opioid epidemic impacts all racial and ethnic groups, but attention paid to this epidemic has often neglected to include Black/African American communities…
Headline
Sejal B. Shah, M.D., and Carla B. Monteiro, a licensed clinical social worker, at Boston-based Brigham and Women’s Hospital write that stigma and disparities…
#HealthCareInnovation Thursday Blog
During the COVID-19 pandemic, opioid overdoses have skyrocketed — doubling in some places from just one year ago. Physical isolation, disruption in regular…