The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday alerted clinicians to an increase in Respiratory Syncytial Virus since late March in certain Southern states. The common respiratory virus usually causes mild cold-like symptoms but can be serious, especially for infants and older adults.  

“Due to reduced circulation of RSV during the winter months of 2020-2021, older infants and toddlers might now be at increased risk of severe RSV-associated illness since they have likely not had typical levels of exposure to RSV during the past 15 months,” the advisory notes.

CDC recommends clinicians consider testing patients with RSV symptoms and a negative SARS-CoV-2 test for non-SARS-CoV-2 respiratory pathogens such as RSV, and report laboratory-confirmed RSV cases and suspected clusters of severe respiratory illness to their state or local health department. Health care personnel, child care providers and staff of long-term care facilities also should avoid reporting to work while acutely ill, even if they test negative for SARS-CoV-2, the agency notes.

 

Related News Articles

Headline
A new special issue of Health Services Research highlights cutting-edge research from experts in age-friendly care. All articles are free and…
Blog
I’m often asked, “Why did you choose a career in health care?” My “why” has always been to help people and to make a difference. A career in health care was…
Blog
  I’ve been in the health care field for over 30 years, starting my career as a medical technologist and moving into administration after obtaining a master’s…
Headline
To help guide physician and patient conversations as part of the American Board of Internal Medicine’s Choosing Wisely campaign, the Society of General…
Headline
In a guest blog for the Institute for Diversity and Health Equity, Lisa Mallory, CEO of the National Association of Health Services Executives, reflects on the…
Blog
    “Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.” These words Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. shared in 1966…