The National Institutes of Health today released a study suggesting one in every four COVID-19 deaths in U.S. hospitals may have been attributed to the dire strain that surges in caseloads placed on hospitals during the pandemic.

The study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, analyzed data from 150,000 COVID-19 inpatient visits from 558 hospitals between March and August 2020. The findings have implications for hospital preparedness, how health care facilities can allocate resources, and how public health authorities can assess and react to local data.

The data also underscore the critical need for more funding to help hospitals and health systems increase resources and staff to manage caseload surging during public health emergencies.

Related News Articles

Headline
Commenting on a forthcoming Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ rule requiring COVID-19 vaccinations for workers in most health care settings…
Chairperson's File
On this episode, I discuss emergency preparedness, caregiver resiliency and health equity — all through the lens of the COVID-19 pandemic — with Fritz Francois…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services today announced that the agency will pay for Medicare beneficiaries’ booster doses, without cost sharing…
Headline
AHA today urged the Office of the United States Trade Representative to extend the current Section 301 tariff exemptions for certain medical devices to ensure…
Headline
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention early Friday morning opted for a broad endorsement of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster shots, issuing interim…
Headline
The AHA today urged the Health Resources and Services Administration to quickly distribute the $17 billion in Phase 4 provider relief funds and $8.5 billion in…