The estimated number of U.S. residents under age 20 with type 1 diabetes increased 45% from 2001 to 2017 to 215 per 100,000, while the number with type 2 diabetes increased 95% to 67 per 100,000, according to a federally funded study published today in JAMA. Type 1 diabetes remains more common among white youth while Type 2 diabetes remains more common among youth in racial or ethnic minority groups.

“More research is needed to better understand the underlying causes of the increases we’re seeing in type 1 and type 2 diabetes in U.S. youth,” said lead author Jean Lawrence, director of the Diabetes Epidemiology Program at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. “Increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes could be caused by rising rates of childhood obesity, in utero exposure to maternal obesity and diabetes, or increased diabetes screenings. The impact of diabetes on youth is concerning as it has the potential to negatively impact these youth as they age and could be an early indicator of the health of future generations.”
 

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