America’s hospitals and health systems support patient protections in the No Surprises Act, but the law and associated regulations offer only a partial cure, writes Ashley Thompson, AHA’s senior vice president for public policy analysis and development. Read more in this blog about why the best way to protect patients from surprise medical bills is to ensure that every form of comprehensive coverage are subject to strict network adequacy rules. And read the AHA’s full comment letter here, submitted Sept. 1 to the departments of Health and Human Services, Labor, and Treasury, along with the Office of Personnel Management. 

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