Most adults aged 50 to 80 have concerns when deciding whether to have elective surgery but are very satisfied with the outcome if they have the surgery done, according to the University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging

Among older adults who considered whether to have an elective operation in the past five years, 64% said they had concerns about potential pain or discomfort; 57% about a difficult recovery; and 46% about out-of-pocket costs, exposure to COVID-19 or time off work. Another 34% were concerned about having someone care for them afterwards, 21% about transportation, and 17% about their ability to care for someone else. Two in three older adults who had elective surgery said they were very satisfied with the outcome. 

The researchers say the findings highlight opportunities to better support older adults who consider elective surgery. 
 

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