The AHA and American Medical Association today moved to dismiss their challenge to the federal government’s September 2021 interim final rule governing the No Surprises Act’s independent dispute resolution process. 

The groups challenged the rule in a District of Columbia court last December, but the lawsuit became moot when the Administration released a revised final rule on Aug. 26. However, the AHA and AMA remain concerned that the final rule continues to favor insurers and does not line up with what Congress intended when it passed the law.   

In a joint statement the AHA and AMA said, “No patient should fear receiving a surprise medical bill. That is why the AHA and AMA strongly supported the No Surprises Act to protect patients from unexpected medical bills and keep them out of the middle of any billing disputes between providers and commercial health insurance companies. Congress enacted the law with a balanced, patient-friendly approach, and it should be implemented that way. We have serious concerns that the August 2022 final rule departs from Congressional intent just as the September 2021 interim final rule did. Hospitals and doctors intend to make our voices heard in the courts very soon about these continued problems.”

The AHA and AMA’s suit did not seek to prevent the law’s core patient protections from moving forward. It sought only to force the Administration to bring the regulations in line with the law before the dispute negotiations begin.

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