Antibiotic resistance – when bacteria stop responding to the drugs designed to kill them – may be the single most important infectious disease threat of our time. We risk turning back the clock to a world where simple infections can kill people as they did a century ago. Already more than 2 million people in the United States get infections that are resistant to antibiotics every year – and at least 23,000 people die as a result. If hospitals were to lose antibiotics, we would also undermine our ability to treat patients with sepsis, cancer, provide organ transplants, and save victims of burns and trauma. November 16-22 is Get Smart About Antibiotics Week, an opportunity for hospitals to review their antibiotic stewardship program and promote understanding of this important topic. AHA’s Physician Leadership Forum has an excellent toolkit that includes resources for hospitals, clinicians and patients.

Related News Articles

Headline
HHS and the Department of Defense’s Defense Threat Reduction Agency will provide funding to VenatoRx Pharmaceuticals to develop a novel antibiotic to treat…
Headline
The Department of the Treasury and Internal Revenue Service today expanded the list of preventive care benefits that high-deductible health plans can cover…
Headline
Under a new Centers for Medicare…
Headline
Public or non-profit community-based organizations may apply for funding to support innovative research proposals to prevent health care-associated infections…
Insights and Analysis
Genesis Health System in Davenport, Iowa, estimates its employee wellness program has saved $53 million in health care costs over a decade by incentivizing…
Headline
An estimated 23 percent of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions filled by privately insured children and non-elderly adults in the United States in 2016 were…