Hospitals with structural characteristics reflecting volume, accreditations and advanced services tend to perform better than others on publicly reported quality measures but are penalized significantly in the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program, according to a study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association. “These findings suggest that penalization in the HAC program may not reflect poor quality of care, but rather, these findings may be due to measurement and validity issues of the HAC program component measures,” the authors said.

Related News Articles

Webinar Recordings
Member
Learn how a Patient Risk Assessment Profile allowed nurses to proactively assess patient risk to guide staffing decisions and nurse-patient assignment.…
Webinar Recordings
Member
Tuesday, August 6, 2019
Letter
Public
AHA encourages Congressional leaders to pass the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness…
Issue Brief
How are value and health equity connected?
Letter
Public
Download the letter (PDF) below Re: CMS—3346—P, Medicare
Case Studies
In 2001, a Samaritan Health Services (SHS) physician, Dr. Richard Wopat, recognized the need to improve birth outcomes of high-risk pregnant women in the…